Graves at St Gwinear: part 2: John Grose (1793 – 1842)

Another Grave!

Still at the Parish Church of Saint Gwinear in Cornwall, we have another interesting grave/memorial to look at.

John Grose:

This time it’s John Grose (the younger brother of Matthew Grose (1788-1849) who migrated to the Isle of Man).

Image of grave at St Gwinear Church, Cornwall © (Posted with permission of image owner: Fiona)

Transcription provided with photo:

SACRED

TO

THE MEMORY OF

JOHN GROSE

Who departed this life on the

16th day of May

1842

Aged 49 years.

Also of

JANE GROSE

Wife of the above

Who departed this life on the

30th day of October

1856

Aged 50 years.

In love they lived, in peace they died

Their lives was craved but God denied.

ALSO OF

EDWARD JENNINGS

Who died June 23rd 1878

Aged 54 years

He died trusting in his saviour.

What do we know about John Grose?

John Grose is the son of Captain Matthew Grose (1761-1824) whose Memorial is also at Gwinear and details covered in this other post.

According to the 1841 census (below) and also his 1842 Will, John Grose was a grocer and draper in Goldsithney, Perranuthnoe, Cornwall.

(Source: Class: HO107; Piece: 143; Book: 11; Civil Parish: Perran Ulthnoe; County: Cornwall; Enumeration District: 6; Folio: 27; Page: 22; Line: 15; GSU roll: 241265 (Census Returns of England and Wales, 1841; Ancestry.com Operations, Inc; 2010; Provo, UT, USA))

We don’t have a baptism record for John Grose yet, but from his grave we can estimate his birth around 1793.

This fits with the Cornwall Memorial Inscription record on FindMyPast.

First name(s) JOHN
Last name GROSE
Age 49
Birth year 1793
Death year 1842
Death date May 1842
Place GWINEAR

 

Also the England & Wales Deaths 1837-2007 record on FindMyPast

Death quarter 2
Death year 1842
District Penzance
County Cornwall
Volume 9
Page 152

 

Although we have this Memorial Inscription and death record, we don’t yet have a burial record in Gwinear. Is this headstone indicating a burial place, or memorial for John Grose?

Captain?

Another question: He is titled as Captain John Grose on his mother’s obituary.

“At Goldsithney, in Perranuthnoe, on the 23rd instant, at the house of her son, Capt. John Grose, Mrs. Jane Grose, aged 80 years, relict of the late Capt. Matthew Grose, formerly of Gwinear, and of Dodington in Somerset, much regretted and respected by her numerous family and friends. Her end was peace.”

Was he a retired ‘Mine Captain’, or another type of ‘Captain’?

His Will

His Will (transcription ongoing) looks like a an excellent resource of information as mentions some provision for his four living siblings:

“Mary, wife of Mine Agent, Henry Francis”…

“Elizabeth wife of Mine Agent, Obadiah Ash”…

“Eliza, wife of Mine Agent, Absalom Francis.” …

“the children of my brother Captain Matthew Grose as shall be then living.”…



(The National Archives; Kew, England; Prerogative Court of Canterbury and Related Probate Jurisdictions: Will Registers; Class: PROB 11; Piece: 1966)

What do we know about Jane Grose?

According to the marriage record of John Grose and Jane Jennings on 26th January, 1840 from the Cornwall OPC Database, Jane Grose (nee Jennings) is from Gwinear and daughter of Thomas Jennings, a farmer.

With further research on the Cornwall OPC Database, we see Jane’s mother is likely Ann Jennings (nee Hambly). Ann Hambly and Thomas Jennings married in Gwinear in 1802.

We don’t see a baptism in Gwinear for a Jane Jennings, but we have a record for Jennifer Jennings to parents ‘Thomas and Anne Jennings’ which looks like the best match for her.

Day Month 08-Feb
Year 1807
Parish Or Reg District Gwinear
Forename Jennifer
Surname JENNINGS
Sex dau
Father Forename Thomas
Mother Forename Anne

..

From Cornwall OPC database we have a burial record for Jane Grose in 1856 in Gwinear which corresponds with the grave.

What do we know about Edward Jennings?

Edward Jennings is the younger brother of Jane Grose (nee Jennings).

The details of his death match closely with those on the Cornwall OPC Database:

Day Month 27-Jun
Year 1878
Parish Or Reg District Gwinear
Forename Edward
Surname JENNINGS
Age 53
Residence Village

His baptism details from Cornwall OPC Database:

Day Month 27-Jun
Year 1824
Parish Or Reg District Gwinear
Forename Edward
Surname JENNINGS
Sex son
Father Forename Thomas
Mother Forename Ann
Residence Gwinear
Father Rank Profession Farmer


Phew (again)!

So once again a few questions answered & as usual a few more things to find out! Please comment or contact if any errors, or have advice or info.

The next post will look at a third interesting gravestone at St Gwinear, Cornwall. Then we’ll go back over to the Isle of Man!

Useful links:

Cornwall OPC Database

 

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Graves at St Gwinear: part 1: Matthew Grose (1761 – 1824)

Thanks Fiona in England & Rob on the Isle of Man. They’ve provided all sorts of extra info & photos. Currently working through & (with their permission) will incorporate into forthcoming posts.

Now… Over to Cornwall!

Quick recap:

Before covering the career of Captain Matthew Grose (1819 – 1887) on the Isle of Man, we’re going for a change of scenery. Back over to Cornwall & Somerset where his grandfather lived & died.

You’ll recall his grandfather was also called Captain Matthew Grose (1761 – 1824) & was the brother of Samuel Grose senior (1764 – 1825). Both baptised in Redruth, Cornwall.

They’re on documents as Mine Captains running Dodington Copper Mines in Somerset for many years. In 1788 we see these two brothers on a mining venture in Loxton, Somerset & both baptising their children there, at the parish church of St. Andrew.

They worked at mines in both Somerset & Cornwall. This other blog post covers their careers & family in more detail.

This Matthew Grose (1761-1824) is the father of Matthew Grose (1788-1849) – who migrated to Foxdale, Isle of Man with his wife & children in 1828.

Graves at St Gwinear:

One of many ‘Wow!’ moments this week was receiving photos of graves, memorials & transcriptions from family history researcher, Fiona. She’s kindly given permission for these to be posted here on the blog.

Each grave will be written about on a separate post, because they all contain key pieces of information.

The Parish Church of Saint Gwinear, Cornwall:

The small village of Gwinear sits on a hill overlooking the Angarrack valley. It’s about three kilometres east of Hayle, Cornwall. There were many mines in the area.

Image of St Gwinear Church, Cornwall © (Posted with permission of image owner: Fiona)

 
At the church there are four main churchyard areas. According to the church website, during 2017, a project is ongoing – to research, record & map ALL burials & memorials there. It’ll be interesting to revisit these records at a later date.

Photograph of Matthew Grose’s Memorial:

Image of Memorial in Gwinear, Cornwall © (Posted with permission of image owner: Fiona)

Transcription provided with photo:

SACRED

To memory of

Captain Matthew Grose

Who died in Doddington in

Sommersetshire the 24th day

Of August 1824 aged 63 years.

And Jane his wife, who died

April 28th 1841 Aged 80 years.

Also William their son who

Died the 1st day of April 1818

Aged 21 years.

And Grace their daughter

Who died February 20th 1818

Aged 19 years.

Firstly, Matthew Grose:

The above transcription shows this as a memorial for Captain Matthew Grose who died in Dodington, Somerset on 24th August 1824 age 63.

The West Somerset Parish Register Transcriptions show his burial record in Dodington as:

Matthew Grose, 11th May, 1824, age 64.

On Findmypast, the Cornwall FHS memorial transcription from Gwinear gives the information as Mathew Grose, 21st August 1821, age 63.

Some slight differences in these records & transcriptions, but nothing too drastic! Confident all refer to same individual.

His wife, Jane Grose:

This transcription gives her information as April 28th 1841, Aged 80 years

This compares closely with her obituary from April 1841:

At Goldsithney, in Perranuthnoe, on the 23rd instant, at the house of her son, Capt. John Grose, Mrs. Jane Grose, aged 80 years, relict of the late Capt. Matthew Grose, formerly of Gwinear, and of Dodington in Somerset, much regretted and respected by her numerous family and friends. Her end was peace.

On Findmypast…

The memorial transcription also gives the information as Jane Grose, age 80, death date 28th April 1841.

Assume this is her death index record (from England & Wales Deaths 1837-2007) because Goldsithney is in the district of Penzance. It shows:

Jane Grose: Death quarter 2, 1841, Penzance, Volume 9, Page 126

William Grose:

The transcription above says died the 1st day of April 1818 Aged 21 years.

On FindMyPast…

Memorial transcription gives 17th April, 1818, Age 21

Burial transcription at Gwinear: 3rd April, 1818, Age 19.

Checking his baptism transcription, we see William Grose baptised in Gwinear on 27th December 1801 to parents Matthew and Jennifer Grose. This is reassuring that the ‘theory’ of Jennifer and Jane being the same person is holding up.

Grace Grose:

This transcription gives February 20th 1818. Aged 19 years.

On FindMyPast…

Memorial transcription: 20th February 1818, Age 19

Burial transcription: 21st February 1818, Age 17

Checking her baptism transcription, we see Grace Grose baptised in Gwinear on 27th December 1801 to parents Matthew and Jennifer Grose. At the same time as her brother, William – again ‘evidence’ that Jennifer and Jane are the same person.

Is Matthew’s wife, Jane or Jennifer Grose?

Apparently Jenny was originally a common ‘nickname’ for Jane. Perhaps that’s why her name varies on records as Jane, Jenefer, Jennifer, Gennifer etc. No marriage record has been found for a Matthew and Jennifer Grose – only Matthew and Jane.

Who’s actually buried here?

  • Their children? Probably. Both age 20-ish, William and Grace, have burial records in 1818 for Gwinear, so are likely buried here. How sad (and strange) that they were baptised at the same time & died within a few months of each other. Coincidence? Illness? An accident?

Their older brother, (our Matthew Grose (1788-1849)), would likely have attended this burial service in 1818. He was still in the Hayle/Phillack area (baptising own children, Mary in 1817 and Matthew in 1819).

  • Matthew Grose? No, this is a memorial for him. His burial record is in Dodington, Somerset. 1821 or 1824? Is there a gravestone in Dodington (All Saints Church?) in addition to this Memorial in Gwinear?

Our Matthew Grose (1788-1849)), might have attended this burial in Dodington, Somerset in 1824. He was in Dodington in 1821 (baptising son, Thomas). Also his son, John, was born (in ‘England’) around 1824.

  • Jane Grose (nee Williams)? Possibly. No burial record found yet for Jane. She could be buried here in Gwinear with her children. She died in April 1841 in Goldsithney, Perranuthnoe (Penzance district).

Phew!

So a few questions answered & few more things to find out! As always, please comment or contact if spot any errors, or have useful advice or info.

The next post will look at another interesting gravestone at St Gwinear, Cornwall.

Further reading and useful research sites:

www.findmypast.com

www.ancestry.co.uk

http://www.opc-cornwall.org/Par_new/e_g/gwinear.php

http://www.cornwall-opc-database.org/

http://www.westcountrygenealogy.com/cornwall/gwinear/

Matthew Grose opens ‘a fine granite quarry’ at Foxdale

Quick recap

You will recall from a previous post, (The Saga of Matthew Grose, John Taylor and The Isle of Man Mining Company) that during January 1846, Captain Matthew Grose (1788-1849) was dramatically and unfairly dismissed (handcuffs indeed!!) from the Isle of Man (Foxdale) Mining Company.

By July 1846, the Crown Mine Agent, John Taylor had stepped in and deprived the company of their lease to land throughout the island, (apart from their mines at Marown). He gave Captain Matthew Grose setts of land taken from the company.

So what happened next?

A fine granite quarry:

By September 1846, the Manx Liberal newspaper reported on an exciting new venture by the entrepreneurial Captain Grose, his sons and Richard Powning (his son-in-law):

“We are gratified to learn that in consequence of the recent eruptions at the Foxdale mines, our Island is likely to he benefitted to a considerable extent. A fine granite quarry has just been opened in the neighbourhood of the mines by Messrs. Grose and Powning, and we learn that orders have been received for large shipments of the stones to Birkenhead, to be used in the construction of the docks now building there.”

Manx Liberal, Saturday, September 12, 1846; Page: 3, Courtesy of Manx National Heritage

The first shipment:

By January 1847, the Manx Sun newspaper reports on the first shipment of Foxdale granite leaving the island for Birkenhead. There is also interest from London for paving blocks.

“The first shipment of excellent granite, raised at Foxdale, took place this week at Peel, for Birkenhead. Some of the blocks weighed five tons, and are intended for the construction of Birkenhead docks. We likewise have heard that a party in London are in treaty with the workers of this quarry for smaller blocks, suitable for paving. The stone is reported to be of excellent quality.”

Manx Sun, Saturday, January 16, 1847; Page: 4, Courtesy of Manx National Heritage

Paving Douglas:

In January 1847, it is reported that Douglas is to be paved with Foxdale granite…

“We understand that the High Bailiff of this town [Douglas] intends to order -from the proprietors of the granite quarry, at Foxdale, stone to pave the market-place. If found to answer, of which there can be no doubt, the streets are to be all paved with the recently-explored Foxdale granite, of which there is an inexhaustible supply. It is said to surpass the Scotch granite, the only place where that stone is to be had in Great Britain.”

 

Manx Liberal, Saturday, January 30, 1847; Page: 3, Courtesy of Manx National Heritage

Church at St. John’s:



In May 1847, the Manx Liberal newspaper reported on the enormous quantities of granite being shipped and how the new church at St Johns’s will be built of Foxdale granite:

The granite quarry at Foxdale, is likely to become of great benefit to this Island. Tbe number of men has been increased of late, and carts from the different parishes in the Island are employed in conveying the blocks of stone to Douglas daily, from whence it is exported to London; one day this week the dray of Mr. John Hogg, of this town, brought down three tons, in company with a train of other carts. Several of the hands who worked at the Scotch quarries are employed here, and by them the stone is acknowledged to be of a superior quality, and is of easier transition for exportation than in Scotland. The new church at St. John’s, it is said, will be built of this stone.

Manx Liberal, Saturday, May 22, 1847; Page: 3, Courtesy of Manx National Heritage


Image of Tynwald Church, St John’s © (Posted with permission of image owner: Rob Cannell, Isle of Man)

Stone for sale:

In May 1848, we see Matthew Grose, Richard Powning (his son-in-law) and a business associate, Charles Berry, selling off granite stone:


Manx Sun, Wednesday, May 17, 1848, Courtesy of Manx National Heritage

(If anyone knows what this ‘Coroner’s Sale’ might imply, please let me know!)

Death:

In 1849, Captain Matthew Grose passes away on 19th June, 1849 and buried on 23rd June at St. Ruinus, Marown.

“On Thursday last at Laburnum Cottage, near this town. Capt Matthew Grose, for many years manager of the Foxdale Mines, aged 70 years.”

Manx Sun, Wednesday, June 27, 1849; Page: 5, Courtesy of Manx National Heritage

The Albert Tower:

Just a month after Captain Grose’s death, the Manx Liberal newspaper reports on the opening of the Albert Tower in Ramsey and how Foxdale granite was used for the window corners:

The Tower was built by subscription by the inhabitants of Ramsey, from the design of G. W Buck, Esq.; it is a square building, about forty feet high, built of blue slate, with the exception of the window corners and coping, which are built of granite from the Foxdale quarries. The door is on the eastern side, over which are the three legs of man, and the following inscription :

—”Albert Tower. Erected on the spot where H.R.H. Prince Albert stood to view Ramsey and its neighbourhood, during the visit of Her Most Gracious Majesty Queen Victoria to Ramsey Bay, the XXth September, MDCCCXLVII.”

Manx Liberal, Saturday, July 28, 1849; Page: 3, Courtesy of Manx National Heritage
img_4243
Image of Albert Tower, Ramsey, Isle of Man © (Image owner: Adventurous Ancestors)

A tribute:

Perhaps it is a fitting tribute to the adventurous ancestor, Captain Matthew Grose. He was baptised in the tiny hilltop village of Loxton, Somerset in 1788 whilst his Cornish father and uncle were there on a speculative copper mining venture.
After his own mining adventures (in Cornwall, Somerset and the Isle of Man), he ends by contributing materials to build Birkenhead docks, pave the streets of Douglas and London, build a church at St John’s and finally decorate the Albert Tower – which is built on a hilltop, celebrating the visit of Royalty.

Further reading:

Quarries
Albert Tower
Church at St John’s

Matthew Grose and Mary Tregonning, married 1839 in Halkyn, Flintshire

Another little diversion of sorts…

From census and obituary records we know that Matthew Grose (1788 – 1849) was married twice.

Firstly to Mary Wearn (1790-1839) who he married 6th June 1809 in Phillack, Cornwall.

This Mary died at Foxdale Mines, Isle of Man on 8th January 1839.

Secondly to another Mary – who (from marriage index records and discussing with others over the years) we’ve worked out was most likely Mary Tregonning (1796-1864).

According to the England & Wales, Civil Registration Marriage Index, 1837-1915, Mary Tregonning and Matthew Grose both married in Quarter 3 (July-Aug-Sept), 1839 in Holywell, Flintshire.

If this is the right person, Matthew Grose married Mary Tregonning seven months after his first wife, (Mary Wearn) died.

The big questions have always been:

Why did Matthew Grose get married in Flintshire if he lived in the Isle of Man? Was his new wife living there?

If he remarried in 1839, where is his new spouse (now, Mary Grose) on the 1841 census, which was taken on the evening of 6th June 1841? She is on the Isle of Man as his widow in the 1851 and 1861 censuses.


It was worthwhile obtaining their marriage record to look for more clues:

From the marriage record we find the following additional information:

Date of Marriage: 12th August, 1839

Place of Marriage: Parish Church of Halkin (Halkyn), Flintshire

To see they married in Halkyn is very interesting because Matthew Grose’s younger sister, Eliza lived there with her husband, Absalom Francis who was the Mine Agent at Halkyn lead mines.

The groom, Matthew Grose, is a widower and mine agent. His father is Matthew Grose, a mine agent.

This information helps confirm that we’ve got the ‘right’ Matthew Grose here!

The bride, Mary Tregonning, is a spinster. Her father is James Tregonning, a mine agent.

This is interesting as we didn’t know if Mary was a spinster or a widow. Also we haven’t had her father’s name or occupation before seeing this record.

Residence at time of marriage: Llan Township

Were they both really ‘living’ there, or just visiting?

The witnesses are Mary and William Davy (or Davey?)

I think their surname looks like ‘Davy‘ – what do others think?

These witnesses need further research to see if there is any family connection. Matthew Grose’s grandmother’s maiden name was ‘Davy/Davey’. Also, his sister’s (Eliza’s) mother-in-law’s maiden name was ‘Davy/Davey’.

Just to go off on another tangent – one day we’ll figure out where Sir Humphry Davy – the famous Cornish chemist and inventor – fits into this family tree.

Undoubtedly information from this marriage record will form the basis of further research and likely another genealogical rabbit warren  to lose ourselves in!

History of Mining and Engineers in Cornwall: A great resource

A short diversion before we continue with the tale of Captain Matthew Grose and his sons, (the Cornish Mine Agents in the Isle of Man).

NAVSBOOKS

Anyone with a deeper interest in the history of mining and engineers in Cornwall, should follow the fantastic NAVSBOOKS blog.

“Navsbooks is the blog and website of the author and publisher John Manley, who produces books on maps, navigation and Cornish history.”


The NAVSBOOKS blog covers in great detail many of those involved in Cornish mining and engineering, including Samuel Grose, John Taylor and William West.

ISLE OF MAN

Interestingly it seems that all of these had links of some sort to the Isle of Man.

We’ve already seen how Samuel Grose (“the most scientific engineer in Cornwall”) was the first cousin of Matthew Grose (1788-1849), who moved to the Isle of Man. Also how John Taylor intervened when the Isle of Man Mining company dramatically dismissed Matthew Grose.

But what about William West?

WILLIAM WEST

A newspaper article from 1851, in the Manx Sun, describes how the Tynwald Mining Company (operating in Marown, Isle of Man) imported…

 “a splendid engine”

that was…

“erected under the direction of Mr. William West of Cornwall which works admirably and fully to the satisfaction of all concerned.”



Manx Sun, Saturday, August 30, 1851, Courtesy of Manx National Heritage

Yet again we see the close ties between mining and engineering in the Isle of Man and Cornwall.

The saga of Matthew Grose, John Taylor and the Isle of Man Mining Company

Before we cover the career of Captain Matthew Grose (1819 – 1887), we’re going to look back more closely at his father’s time with The Isle of Man Mining Company.

Just to recap – his father was Captain Matthew Grose (1788 – 1849) born in Loxton, Somerset to Cornish parents. He was a first cousin of the ‘most scientific engineer in Cornwall’, Captain Samuel Grose junior (1791 – 1866).

FIRSTLY… HAPPY TIMES!

In 1828, The Isle of Man Mining Company is formed by three adventurers from the Chester area. The mines at Foxdale are under the management of Mr. William Jones. Captain Matthew Grose (1788 – 1849) is employed as the Mine Agent there.

In 1833, local newspapers indicate that Matthew Grose is a popular Agent and member of the community. By this time he’d worked for the Isle of Man Mining Company for approximately five years.

After a company dinner, the engineer of the water wheel, Thom Anthony, expresses his gratitude by writing into the Mona’s Herald newspaper.

…we have great reason to be very satisfied and thankful in this neighbourhood, as so many of us are employed by the Isle of Man Company

Thom praises his employers…

…while the worthy adventurers carry on at the rate they do, and employ so worthy Agents, who behave like gentlemen ought to…

and he describes the music and dancing on Captain Grose’s street…

…cheering the ladies and gentlemen with all our might, three fidlers came forward, and played up as hard as they could, when a ring was made on Captain Grose’s street, and there we enjoyed ourselves and danced away in great style until it became dark…

Thom describes the staff raising a glass to the company…

…drinking the health of the Isle of Man Mining Company and their Agents



Mona’s Herald, Friday, October 04, 1833; Page: 3, Courstesy of Manx National Heritage


In 1844 Captain Grose advertises for a schoolmaster for the Foxdale Mines School. It is understood the school has been open on the Isle of Man since 1833, or earlier.

Mona’s Herald, Tuesday, May 14, 1844; Section: Front page, Page: 1 Courtesy of Manx National Heritage.

DRAMATIC DISMISSAL!

In January 1846, after eighteen years of employment with the Isle of Man Mining company, Captain Matthew Grose is dramatically dismissed from his position. Rumours swirl that he has been ejected from his dwelling in handcuffs and not paid his salary.

The company place a Public Notice in the newspaper announcing his dismissal:


Manx Liberal, Saturday, January 10, 1846; Page: 2, Courtesy of Manx National Heritage

As ‘the skeet‘ (gossip) spreads across the Isle of Man, Matthew Grose responds a week later by placing his own advertisement in the newspaper, showing that he is…

“..as ignorant of the cause of my Offence as the Public themselves.”


Manx Liberal, Saturday, January 17, 1846; Page: 11, Courtesy of Manx National Heritage

During March 1846, Matthew Grose further defends his character by publishing documents from the Isle of Man Mining company – which state he was considered…

“…honest, sober and attentive and having a good knowledge of practical mining operations.”

It seems that after the death of the general manager, Mr William Jones, the company were just having a ‘general change in management’ at Foxdale mines and…

“…now express their regret that so harsh a mode was adopted as they are informed was done–as it was far from their intention to cast any imputation on Capt.Grose’s character…”

 


Manx Liberal, Saturday, March 07, 1846, Courtesy of Manx National Heritage

JOHN TAYLOR INTERVENES!

By July 1846, there is a dramatic conclusion to the saga when the Crown mining agent, John Taylor, intervenes. He deprives the Isle of Man Mining company of their lease to land throughout the island, (apart from their mines at Marown) and gives Captain Matthew Grose setts of land taken from the company. The rest of the island (except Lonan) is thrown open to the public.

The newspaper reports…

“The advantages to be derived to the inhabitants by the visit of Mr. Taylor are incalculable; and much is due to Capt.Grose for having been the chief instrument by which all these beneficial changes have been effected.

 

The company takes action too:

“The Company, determined not to be outdone by Mr. Taylor, have crowned his operations by paying Captain Grose the money due to him, and by a second time dismissing Mr. Beckwith from his situation as cashier! ! “

 

Undoubtably capturing the relief and mood of the public at the time…

“This is retributive justice with a vengeance. Handcuffs indeed!!



 Mona’s Herald, Wednesday, July 15, 1846; Page: 3, Courtesy of Manx National Heritage.

 

 …

In the next post, we’ll see what opportunities and risks were taken by Captain Matthew Grose (and his sons) after these dramatic events!

Thanks’, Resources and Further Reading:

Many thanks to iMuseum Newspapers & Publications  for providing digital access to the Isle of Man newspapers (from 1792 to 1960). Images and text are shared on this blog in accordance with their policy of using & sharing for ‘non-commercial personal use’.

 The family of Captain Matthew Grose (1819 – 1887)

During the 1800s, Captain Matthew Grose was a prominent figure in the Isle of Man lead, copper and silver mining industry. From newspaper reports it is clear that he was also a popular and beloved member of the local community.

With ten siblings, two wives and sixteen children – this post will focus on his family.

His mining career will be covered in another post.

Photograph of Captain Matthew Grose from around 1880, courtesy of Manx National Heritage

CHILDHOOD:



He was baptised on 19th March 1819 in Phillack, Cornwall to parents Matthew Grose and Mary Wearn.
His father, Matthew Grose (1788 – 1849), grandfather, Matthew Grose (1761 – 1824) and great uncle, Samuel Grose senior (1764 – 1825) were mine captains from Cornwall and worked at mines in Cornwall and Somerset.

Many other family members were involved in mining and engineering in England and the Isle of Man. His father’s cousin was the famous engineer Samuel Grose (1791 – 1866).

His aunts were married to Henry Francis, Absalom Francis and Obadiah Ash.

Many of his brothers and brother-in-laws were engineers, mine captains and agents.
Matthew Grose moved to the Isle of Man around 1828, at the age of nine where his father became a Mine Agent at Foxdale Mines.

Siblings:


He had 4 brothers and 6 sisters:

  • Emma Grose (1812 – 1881) – wife of Jonathan Harrison


Manx Sun, Friday, April 24, 1835; Page: 3, Courtesy of Manx National Heritage

  • Jane Grose (1814 – 1884) – wife of Richard T.C. Powning


Manx Sun, Friday, February 14, 1840; Page: 5, Courtesy of Manx National Heritage

  • Mary Grose (1817 – 1822)
  • Thomas Grose (1821 – 1882) – husband of Jane ?
  • John Grose (1824 – ?) – husband of Charlotte Clucas (NOT Louisa Little)

Mona’s Herald, Wednesday, January 15, 1845; Page: 7 Courtesy of Manx National Heritage

  • Mary Grose (1826 – ?) – wife of Joseph Waterhouse
  • Eliza Grace Grose (1828 – 1907)
  • Edwin William Wearn Grose (1832 – 1908) – husband of Elizabeth Lace
  • Samuel Grose (1833 – ?)
  • Lavinia Grose (1833 – ?) – wife of John Henry Millington

 

RESIDENCES:

From baptism, census & burial records:

  • 1819 – Phillack, Cornwall (baptised)
  • 1821 – Dodington, Somerset (likely lived here when brother Thomas baptised here)
  • 1841 – Foxdale Mines, Isle of Man (miner)
  • 1851 – Ballagawne, Rushen, Isle of Man (Agent of mines)
  • 1861 -Ballacorkish, Rushen, Isle of Man (Lead & Copper Mine Agent)
  • 1871 -Ballakilpatrick, Isle of Man (Agent Lead Mines)
  • 1881 – The Level, Rushen, Isle of Man (Captain of Lead Mine Unemployed)
  • 1888 – Ballavayre, Colby, Isle of Man (from burial record)

 

MARRIED LIFE:

First Marriage:
He married his first wife Anne Weston Read (1822 – 1868) at Kirk German, Isle of Man on 3rd October, 1841. Anne was the only daughter of John Read, Civil Engineer.



Mona’s Herald, Tuesday, October 12, 1841; Page: 3, Courtesy of Manx National Heritage

They had 11 children:

  • Alfred Matthew Grose (1842 – ?) – husband of Ann Cubbon
  • Matthew John Grose (1843 – 1905) – husband of Louisa Adie
  • Walter Henry Grose (1847 – 1902) – husband of Elizabeth Kneale
  • Emma Mary Grose (1847 – 1920) – wife of William Clarke Dawson
  • Martin Grose? (1848 – ?)
  • Frederick William Grose (1850 – 1858)
  • Francis Read Grose (1852 – 1889) – husband of Fanny Summerville Thomson
  • Clara Weston Grose (1853 – ?) – wife of William Kinnock
  • Florence Amelia Grose (1855 – 1879)
  • Albert Edwin Grose (1858 – 1931) – husband of Mary Ann Wright?

Manx Sun, Saturday, February 06, 1858; Page: 5

  • Horace Hamlet Grose (1860 – 1908) – husband of Elizabeth Vick

His wife, Anne, died in May 1868 and was buried 8th May 1868 in Marown, Isle of Man.

Manx Sun, Saturday, May 09, 1868; Page: 21, Courtesy of Manx National Heritage

Second Marriage:

He married his second wife, a widow, Elizabeth Luff (nee Qualtrough) (1835 – 1918) on 22nd September, 1868.



Isle of Man Times, Saturday, October 03, 1868; Page: 5, Courtesy of Manx National Heritage

They had 5 children:

  • Beatrice Catherine Grose (1869 – 1929) – wife of Richard Clague
  • Maud Mary Grose (1872 – 1920) – wife of William Edmund Moore
  • Laura Margaret Grose (1875 – ?) – wife of William Henry Cubbon
  • Herbert Qualtrough Grose (1879 – 1956)
  • Frederick William Grose (1881 – ?)

Matthew Grose died on the 11th October 1887 and was buried on the 14th October in Rushen, Isle of Man. Interesting that this newspaper spells his property Beal-e-Vere whereas other records have the more ‘manx sounding’ Ballavayre!


Manx Sun, Saturday, October 22, 1887; Page: 13, Courtesy of Manx National Heritage

His wife, Elizabeth died in 1918 and was buried 19th June, 1918 in Rushen, Isle of Man.


 Isle of Man Examiner, Saturday, June 22, 1918; Page: 2, Courtesy of Manx National Heritage

FURTHER READING AND RESOURCES:

Most information in this post (but not quite all!) concurs with that within the fantastic ‘Lawson Spouses’ research papers of the late Brian Lawson. Some differences are because other records have been discovered recently.

Please contact here if you spot errors, have extra information to share, or require specific details.

View more records from the Isle of Man Museum http://imuseum.im/search/all/search?tab=all&view=&term=grose&sort=&size=20&images=

 

 

 

The migration of Matthew Grose (1788 – 1849)

Leaving the south west and heading north.

Matthew Grose, born in 1788, is the Adventurous Ancestor who left the mines of Cornwall and Somerset in England.

Around 1828 he was seeking new opportunities in the mines of Foxdale in the Isle of Man.

Moving with his wife, children, other family members, friends and mining / engineering colleagues from Cornwall  – they all headed across the breezy Irish Sea.

Upon arrival in the Isle of Man, his community-minded wife, Mrs Mary Grose (nee Wearn), would have noticed the hustle and bustle in the town of Douglas.

“Women often with round hats, like the Welsh, and girls without shoes and stockings, though otherwise not ill dressed..”

 

 (Extract from a visitor’s diary in 1828)

Bringing mining expertise to the island

Matthew Grose came from a renowned family of mining captains and engineers. Like other Cornishmen migrating to the Isle of Man, he brought with him specialised skills and direct experience of new technologies that were revolutionising mining at that time.

Previously we’ve read about his father, Matthew Grose (1760 – 1824) and uncle, Samuel Grose senior  (1764 – 1825) who were mining captains in Cornwall and Somerset.

Captain Matthew Grose (1788 – 1849) was a first cousin to Captain Samuel Grose junior (1791 – 1866), who was a pupil of Richard Trevithick. Samuel Grose junior was called the ‘most scientific engineer in Cornwall’.


Many of Matthew Grose’s sons became mine captains, agents and engineers. His sisters and daughters married into families of other Cornish mine captains and engineers.

Timeline for Matthew Grose (1788 – 1849)

1788 Matthew Grose is baptised at the parish church of St Andrew, Loxton, Somerset. His father, Matthew Grose and uncle, Samuel Grose are likely in Loxton with other Cornish miners on an expedition to explore the green veins that have been found in the caves there. Unfortunately these contain no copper and the venture is abandoned.

1789 (likely earlier) – 1800 His father, Matthew and uncle, Samuel are mine captains at the Dodington copper mines.

  • 1793? His brother John baptised in ? 
  • 1797? His sister, Elizabeth baptised in Somerset? (Wife of Obadiah Ash?).

1801 Dodington copper mine in Somerset closes when unable to raise capital to buy a steam pumping engine.

  • 1801 His brother William and sister Grace are baptised in Gwinear.
  • 1807 His sister Elizabeth (Eliza) is baptised in Gwinear
  • 1809 His sister, Mary, marries Henry Francis in Gwinear.

1809 Aged 21, he marries Mary Vivian Wearn in Phillack.

1810 His uncle, Samuel Grose snr and cousin, Samuel Grose jnr, puts their names to a ‘protest of miners’ at Wheal Alfred in the Royal Cornwall Gazette. They are distancing themselves from political reformist, Edward Budd who was establishing a new newspaper (the West Briton or Miners Journal). A ‘Matthew Grose’ signs the petition too – likely him (or father).

  • 1812 His daughter, Emma is baptised in Phillack.
  • 1814 His daughter Jane is baptised in Phillack. On one census she describes herself as from Relubbus. Perhaps her father worked at mines near there.
  • 1817 His daughter Mary is baptised in Phillack

1817 Dodington Copper mines in Somerset reopen when a steam pumping engine is installed.

  • 1819 His son, Matthew is baptised in Phillack.
  • 1821 His son, Thomas is baptised in Dodington, Somerset

1821 Dodington mines in Somerset close after heavy losses.

1824 His father, Matthew Grose, is buried in Dodington, Somerset

  • 1826 His son John is born in England. (No baptism record found yet). John is husband of Charlotte Clucas.
  • 1826 His daughter Mary is baptised in Phillack.

1828 Isle of Man mining company formed by investors from Liverpool, Chester and Flintshire and lease Foxdale mines.

  • 1831 His daughter Eliza Grace is baptised in Marown, Isle of Man
  • 1832 His son Edwin William Wearn Grose is baptised in Marown, Isle of Man
  • 1833 His daughter Lavinia is baptised in Marown, Isle of Man
  • 1835 His eldest daughter, Emma, marries Captain Jonathan Harrison (both ‘of Foxdale Mines’) at Kirk Patrick, Isle of Man. The couple move to Llanidloes in Wales, then onto Meadowtown, Westcott and Snailbeach mines in Shropshire.
  • 1835 His son, Samuel Grose is baptised in Marown, Isle of Man
  • 1837 His sister, Eliza, marries Captain Absalom Francis in Shrewsbury, Shropshire and then to the mines of Halkyn, Flintshire.

1839 His wife Mary Wearn passes away at Foxdale Mines, Isle of Man. Her obituary in the West Briton newspaper, Jan 25, 1839 reads 

“On Tuesday, the 8th instant, at Foxdale Mines, Isle of Man, Mary, the beloved wife of Captain Matthew Grose, aged 49 years, deeply regretted by all her family and friends. Her charities and benevolence had endeared her to all classes, and in her the poor of the surrounding district have lost a kind benefactor and adviser.



Manks Advertiser, Tuesday, January 08, 1839; Page: 3, Courtesy of Manx National Heritage

1839 Aged 51, He marries his second wife, Mary Tregonning in Holywell, Flintshire

  • 1840 His daughter, Jane, marries Richard Powning in Marown, Isle of Man. The witness to their marriage is Foxdale Mine Captain Edward Bawden.

1841 He appears on the 1841 census at Foxdale Mines, Isle of Man as a Mine Agent along with his children Matthew (miner), Thomas (engineer), John (engineer), Mary, Eliza, Edward, Lavinia and Samuel.

1844 Examines lead ore in Castletown


Manx Sun, Saturday, May 04, 1844; Page: 4, Courtesy of Manx National Heritage

  • 1841 His son, Captain Matthew Grose, marries Anne Weston Read in Kirk German, Isle of Man.

1841 His mother, Jane/Jennifer passes away in Goldsithney, Perranuthnoe, Cornwall. Her obituary in the West Briton newspaper reads

 

“At Goldsithney, in Perranuthnoe, on the 23rd instant, at the house of her son, Capt. John Grose, Mrs. Jane Grose, aged 80 years, relict of the late Capt. Matthew Grose, formerly of Gwinear, and of Dodington in Somerset, much regretted and respected by her numerous family and friends. Her end was peace.”

 

1846

Dramatically dismissed (see separate blog post) from the Isle of Man Mining Company


Manx Sun, Saturday, January 10, 1846; Page: 8, Courtesy of Manx National Heritage

1846

Opens stone quarry to send granite to Birkenhead for building docks.

1849 

Matthew Grose passes away.


Manx Sun, Wednesday, June 27, 1849; Page: 5

He is buried at Marown, Isle of Man


Resources and further reading:

http://www.manxmines.com/manx__mines__history.htm

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/domesday/dblock/GB-226000-476000/page/10

http://www.nmrs.org.uk/assets/pdf/BM3/BM3-34-42-introduction.pdf

https://www.gov.im/lib/docs/mnh/education/trb/mining/teachersresourcebkpt2thestoryofmi.pdf

http://www.cornish-mining.org.uk/delving-deeper/cornish-mining-isle-man

Please contact if you spot any errors, or have additional information to improve this post!