Finding Grose Graves at Kirk Christ, Rushen, Isle of Man

Locating the graves of Captain Matthew Grose (1819-1887) and his second wife Elizabeth nee Qualtrough/Luff (1835-1918) has been a challenge.

I am extremely grateful to the people who have helped.

Over the years, fellow researcher, Rob Cannell, has hunted throughout the graveyards at Kirk Chist Holy Trinity Church (Rushen Parish Church) several times. We concluded that Matthew and Elizabeth Grose were most likely buried in unmarked graves, or their headstones were now illegible.

Image of Kirk Christ Holy Trinity Church © (Posted with permission of image owner: Rob Cannell, Isle of Man)

Rob and I even discussed whether they were buried at Rushen at all, when certain records mentioned the place of death as ‘Arbory’.

Could they be at Arbory Parish Church and not Rushen? To confuse myself further, I realised that Arbory Parish Church and Kirk Christ were both in the sheading of Rushen!

A breakthrough!

When Rob found original images of the burial records we studied them closely for clues.

Matthew Grose, buried 14th October 1887


Courtesy of Manx National Heritage via FamilySearch

On the same page, (for other burials) the Vicar’s name was fairly easy to transcribe – a ‘Blundell Browne’ who was easily traced as the Vicar of Kirk Christ, Rushen from 1887-1893. So it was Rushen, not Arbory Church!

The Curate’s name was more difficult to transcribe, but eventually got it as D.M. Jenkyus. This was confirmed with some further online searching which showed there was a Curate at Rushen in 1886, called David Melbourne Jenkyus.

Then there was a code ‘K21‘ the margin. Could this refer to his burial plot?

Rushen Church has several churchyards.

  • The Rushen Old Yard (Southside)
  • The Rushen Old Yard (Northside)
  • The 1899 Old Yard
  • The 1899 Yard
  • The Ashes Plots (in the 1899 Yard)
  • The 1926 Yard
  • The 1967 Yard

Initially, the dates and plots seemed to indicate that Matthew Grose would be in the Rushen Old Yard (Southside) where a row K appeared… but there was no plot 21!

Luckily, I spotted that ‘The 1899 Old Yard’ near the Vicarage garden was probably an extension from 1869.

I’d assumed it was from 1899 onwards, which would have been too late for Matthew Grose’s burial in 1887. However, if ‘The 1899 Old Yard‘  opened in 1869, his grave could be there. Also, a plot ‘K21’ was listed there. It was promising!

Found!

After contacting the very helpful Claire at Rushen (who organised a search), I received the superb photo below of Matthew Grose’s burial plot. Many thanks to Andy Knight for locating & photographing this.

Image of burial plot at Rushen Churchyard © (Posted with permission of image owner: Andy Knight, Isle of Man)

As we’d predicted, there isn’t a headstone or marker here for Matthew Grose junior (1819-1887). Claire advised that few survive – many stones were damaged or lost from this particular churchyard.

Perhaps he had a headstone in the past? Either way, the plot has been found so another mystery SOLVED!

Elizabeth Grose, buried 19th June 1918

We undertook a similar investigation in the hunt for Elizabeth Grose’s headstone, using her burial record found online by Rob.

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Courtesy of Manx National Heritage via FamilySearch

The curate’s name was transcribed as W.R. Cannell. We discovered he was the Rev. William R. Cannell after finding his name online associated with the erection of the Lychgate at Kirk Christ in 1921.

Code 697 appears in the margin and again this was assumed to be the burial plot.

The maps of the churchyards at Kirk Christ indicated that plot 697 was likely to be in ‘The 1899 Yard’.

Claire and Andy did a great job of researching this – locating & photographing her exact plot too.

Image of burial plot at Rushen Churchyard © (Posted with permission of image owner: Andy Knight, Isle of Man)

No headstone or marker here for Elizabeth Grose (1835-1918) either, but another mystery SOLVED!

In the next post we’ll look at some Grose graves at St Runius, Marown, Isle of Man where there is MOST DEFINITELY something special to see!

Thanks’, Resources and Further Reading:

Many thanks to Rob, Claire and Andy for all your help with locating and photographing these plots.

 

 

 

 

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Marriage witnesses: Mary and William Davey… and the mystery of Jane Grose

Recap:

A few weeks ago we looked at the Marriage Record in 1839 (in Halkyn, Flintshire, Wales) for Matthew Grose senior (1788-1849) and his second wife, Mary Tregonning.

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Initially, we wondered what he was doing in Flintshire if he lived in Foxdale, Isle of Man. Then we figured out there was a family connection to the particular location, Halkyn…

Matthew Grose’s younger sister, Eliza lived there with her husband, Absalom Francis who was the Mine Agent at Halkyn lead mines.

via Matthew Grose and Mary Tregonning, married 1839 in Halkyn, Flintshire – Adventurous Ancestors

One of the remaining mysteries were the marriage witnesses…

The witnesses are Mary and William Davy (or Davey?)
I think their surname looks like ‘Davy‘ – what do others think?
These witnesses need further research to see if there is any family connection. Matthew Grose’s grandmother’s maiden name was ‘Davy/Davey’. Also, his sister’s (Eliza’s) mother-in-law’s maiden name was ‘Davy/Davey’.

via Matthew Grose and Mary Tregonning, married 1839 in Halkyn, Flintshire – Adventurous Ancestors

One mystery solved… & another ‘can of worms’ opened!

From further research of the Grose and Francis family connections in Halkyn, Flintshire it has been possible to identify these witnesses. As suspected there is a family connection, but not one that was expected!

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Before we look at the marriage witnesses – a reminder of the parents & siblings of Matthew Grose (1788-1849) is useful:

Parents:

Matthew Grose (1761-1824) and *Jane/Jennifer (nee Williams) (1762-1841).

*The mother, Jane, is recorded as ‘Jennifer’ on some of the children’s baptisms. Note that on the following list of their children, there is no daughter called Jane (or Jennifer) which is unusual as it was traditional naming convention to name a daughter after the mother… (We’ll come back to this point shortly!)

Their children (those in bold are discussed in this post):

  • Mary Grose (1784-likely died as infant before 1786)
  • Mary Grose (1786-1847) married Henry Francis
  • Matthew Grose (1788-1849) married Mary Wearn & Mary Tregonning
  • John Grose (1793-1842) married Jane Jennings
  • Elizabeth Grose (1797-) married Obadiah Ash
  • William Grose (1801-1818)
  • Grace Grose (1801-1818)
  • Eliza Grose (1807-1864) married Absalom Francis (1792-1860) 

What’s this got to do with the witnesses?

The marriage record and further research shows the marriage witnesses are Mary Davey (nee Francis) and her husband, William Davey. Research shows that they resided in Halkyn, Flintshire and several records show them baptising their children there.

This witness, Mary Davey (nee Francis), is the daughter of Absalom Francis (1792-1860) and his first wife, Jane (nee Grose) (1790-1829). Absalom and Jane married in Gwinear, Cornwall on 23rd January, 1812.

Their daughter, Mary Davey (nee Francis) was baptised in Gwinear, Cornwall on 17th May 1812.

This makes Mary Davey (nee Francis), the step-daughter of Eliza Francis (nee Grose) (Matthew’s sister). Eliza was Absalom Francis’s second wife.

So the marriage witness, Mary Davey (nee Francis) is the step-niece of the groom, Matthew Grose (1788-1849).

Straightforward? Not quite!

It is interesting to note that Absalom Francis’s first wife, Jane Grose (1790-1829), is possibly a sister of Eliza Grose (1807-1864) and Matthew Grose (1788-1849)!

On the 1812 marriage entry for Jane Grose and Absalom Francis in Gwinear, the witnesses are a Matw (Matthew) Grose and Henry Francis.

The signature closely matches that of the witness Matw (Matthew) Grose on the 1809 marriage record of Mary Grose and Henry Francis.

It is slightly different to the groom’s signature on the 1809 marriage record of Matthew Grose and Mary Wearn, so possibly the signature of their father, Matthew Grose (1761-1824).

What about the 1835 Marriage Act?

Absalom Francis married his second wife, Eliza Grose, on 6th June 1837.

P253/A/3/8

Image courtesy of Shropshire Archives © via FindMyPast

This is two years after the 1835 Marriage Act. This legally prohibited a man from marrying his deceased wife’s sister. Prior to this, it was just the concern of ecclesiastical law:

Before 1835, the church would annul the marriage of a man with the sister of his late wife if reported, but if no one reported the situation, then the marriage was legal. It was a voidable marriage not a void one.

via A Voidable Marriage in History: Marrying the Sister of One’s Late Wife or the Brother of One’s Late Husband | ReginaJeffers’s Blog

If the deceased Jane Grose (1790-1829) was Eliza’s older sister, then Eliza Grose and Absalom Francis had married secretly and illegally in Shrewsbury in 1837, but then  announced it in a Cornish newspaper!

Lately, at Shrewsbury, Capt. Absalom Francis, of Halkin, in Flintshire, to Miss Grose, of Goldsithney, in this county.

West Briton newspaper, Friday 14th July 1837

Eliza Francis (nee Grose) is definitely the sister of Matthew Grose because they are both mentioned in the will of their brother from Goldsithney, John Grose (1793-1842).

“Mary, wife of Mine Agent, Henry Francis”…
“Elizabeth wife of Mine Agent, Obadiah Ash”…
Eliza, wife of Mine Agent, Absalom Francis.” …
“the children of my brother Captain Matthew Grose as shall be then living.”…

via Graves at St Gwinear: part 2: John Grose (1793 – 1842) – Adventurous Ancestors

Why would Eliza and Absalom have married?

Were there really so many brothers- and sisters-in-law who wanted to get married? Not really, but it was more common than it is now. Women often died in childbirth, and their unmarried sisters, who had few other options to support themselves besides marriage, would step in to care for the family. For convenience, and sometimes developing love, remarriage seemed like the thing to do.

via The 65 Year Battle over the Deceased Wife’s Sister’s Marriage Act | Mental Floss

Marrying the sister of the deceased wife remained illegal until 1907.

The Deceased Wife’s Sister’s Marriage Act finally passed in 1907. By that time, the prohibition had long been lifted in most of Europe, the United States and the colonies. At the same time, society was changing in a way that meant fewer women were dying in childbirth and single women had more opportunities to support themselves. Not as many people wanted to make this kind of marriage. But if they did, they finally had freedom to choose it.

via The 65 Year Battle over the Deceased Wife’s Sister’s Marriage Act | Mental Floss

Conclusion:

We’ve discovered that the marriage witnesses for Matthew Grose and Mary Tregonning in 1839 are Mary Davey (nee Francis) and William Davey. Mary Davey (nee Francis) is unquestionably the step-niece of the groom Matthew Grose because she is the step-daughter of his sister, Eliza Francis (nee Grose).

However, Mary Davey (nee Francis) is Matthew Grose’s actual niece, if her mother Jane Francis (nee Grose) is his sister.

Further research:

A matching signature of “Matw Grose” as marriage witness on Jane Grose and Absalom Francis’s 1812 marriage record (and Mary Grose and Henry Francis’s 1809 marriage record) gives circumstantial evidence, but not conclusive proof that he is the father of both brides.

A baptism record for Jane Grose (1790-1829) would be more useful to prove that she is the daughter of Matthew Grose (1761-1824) and Jane Williams (1762-1841).

However, in 1790, Matthew Grose (1761-1824) was working as Mine Captain in Loxton, Somerset and the church records are badly worn. We are still seeking the baptism records for two of his other children John Grose (1793-1842) and Elizabeth Grose (1797-?).

‘GROSE’ Burials at Gwinear, Cornwall

In previous posts, (parts 1, 2 & 3), we’ve looked at ‘GROSE’ graves & memorials at the Parish Church of Saint Gwinear in Cornwall.

How do these compare with all ‘GROSE’ burials recorded in Gwinear, listed on the Cornwall OPC Database? Is anyone else related to Matthew Grose (1788-1849) who migrated to the Isle of Man?

(Screenshot from Cornwall OPC Database: accessed 15th March, 2017)

Who’s who?

Working down the list in date order…

  • William Grose and Grace Grose are siblings both buried in 1818. Their grave is posted about here. They are the younger siblings of John Grose ‘the Perranuthnoe grocer’ and Matthew Grose ‘who migrated to Foxdale, Isle of Man’.
  • Samuel Grose buried 1825 and Eleanor Grose (nee Giddy) buried 1850, are the parents of ‘the famous engineer’ Samuel Grose. No photo of their grave yet. Can you help?
  • Matthew Grose buried 1853 is the younger brother of ‘the famous engineer’ Samuel Grose. No photo of Matthew’s grave yet. Can you help?
  • Jane Grose (nee Jennings) buried 1856 is the wife of John Grose ‘the Perranuthnoe grocer’ (younger brother of Matthew Grose ‘who migrated to Foxdale, Isle of Man’). Her grave is posted about here.
  • Samuel Grose (buried 1866) is ‘the famous engineer’and Nanny Grose (buried 1867), is Ann (nee Vivian), his wife. Their grave is posted about here.
  • Thomas Grose, buried 1885, not yet researched. Can you help?
  • Ruth Grose, buried 1890, not yet researched. Can you help?

Conclusion:

From the ten individuals buried in Gwinear, graves for half of them have been located, photographed, identified and discussed.

Eight of the individuals listed, (plus others, not buried, but on memorials) are related to our adventurous ancestor, Matthew Grose (1788-1849) who migrated to Foxdale, Isle of Man.

The final two, Ruth and Thomas Grose, might be related too, but they’re to be researched another day!

Next stop, back to the Isle of Man!!