Finding Grose Graves at Kirk Christ, Rushen, Isle of Man

Locating the graves of Captain Matthew Grose (1819-1887) and his second wife Elizabeth nee Qualtrough/Luff (1835-1918) has been a challenge.

I am extremely grateful to the people who have helped.

Over the years, fellow researcher, Rob Cannell, has hunted throughout the graveyards at Kirk Chist Holy Trinity Church (Rushen Parish Church) several times. We concluded that Matthew and Elizabeth Grose were most likely buried in unmarked graves, or their headstones were now illegible.

Image of Kirk Christ Holy Trinity Church © (Posted with permission of image owner: Rob Cannell, Isle of Man)

Rob and I even discussed whether they were buried at Rushen at all, when certain records mentioned the place of death as ‘Arbory’.

Could they be at Arbory Parish Church and not Rushen? To confuse myself further, I realised that Arbory Parish Church and Kirk Christ were both in the sheading of Rushen!

A breakthrough!

When Rob found original images of the burial records we studied them closely for clues.

Matthew Grose, buried 14th October 1887


Courtesy of Manx National Heritage via FamilySearch

On the same page, (for other burials) the Vicar’s name was fairly easy to transcribe – a ‘Blundell Browne’ who was easily traced as the Vicar of Kirk Christ, Rushen from 1887-1893. So it was Rushen, not Arbory Church!

The Curate’s name was more difficult to transcribe, but eventually got it as D.M. Jenkyus. This was confirmed with some further online searching which showed there was a Curate at Rushen in 1886, called David Melbourne Jenkyus.

Then there was a code ‘K21‘ the margin. Could this refer to his burial plot?

Rushen Church has several churchyards.

  • The Rushen Old Yard (Southside)
  • The Rushen Old Yard (Northside)
  • The 1899 Old Yard
  • The 1899 Yard
  • The Ashes Plots (in the 1899 Yard)
  • The 1926 Yard
  • The 1967 Yard

Initially, the dates and plots seemed to indicate that Matthew Grose would be in the Rushen Old Yard (Southside) where a row K appeared… but there was no plot 21!

Luckily, I spotted that ‘The 1899 Old Yard’ near the Vicarage garden was probably an extension from 1869.

I’d assumed it was from 1899 onwards, which would have been too late for Matthew Grose’s burial in 1887. However, if ‘The 1899 Old Yard‘  opened in 1869, his grave could be there. Also, a plot ‘K21’ was listed there. It was promising!

Found!

After contacting the very helpful Claire at Rushen (who organised a search), I received the superb photo below of Matthew Grose’s burial plot. Many thanks to Andy Knight for locating & photographing this.

Image of burial plot at Rushen Churchyard © (Posted with permission of image owner: Andy Knight, Isle of Man)

As we’d predicted, there isn’t a headstone or marker here for Matthew Grose junior (1819-1887). Claire advised that few survive – many stones were damaged or lost from this particular churchyard.

Perhaps he had a headstone in the past? Either way, the plot has been found so another mystery SOLVED!

Elizabeth Grose, buried 19th June 1918

We undertook a similar investigation in the hunt for Elizabeth Grose’s headstone, using her burial record found online by Rob.

.

Courtesy of Manx National Heritage via FamilySearch

The curate’s name was transcribed as W.R. Cannell. We discovered he was the Rev. William R. Cannell after finding his name online associated with the erection of the Lychgate at Kirk Christ in 1921.

Code 697 appears in the margin and again this was assumed to be the burial plot.

The maps of the churchyards at Kirk Christ indicated that plot 697 was likely to be in ‘The 1899 Yard’.

Claire and Andy did a great job of researching this – locating & photographing her exact plot too.

Image of burial plot at Rushen Churchyard © (Posted with permission of image owner: Andy Knight, Isle of Man)

No headstone or marker here for Elizabeth Grose (1835-1918) either, but another mystery SOLVED!

In the next post we’ll look at some Grose graves at St Runius, Marown, Isle of Man where there is MOST DEFINITELY something special to see!

Thanks’, Resources and Further Reading:

Many thanks to Rob, Claire and Andy for all your help with locating and photographing these plots.

 

 

 

 

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‘GROSE’ Burials at Gwinear, Cornwall

In previous posts, (parts 1, 2 & 3), we’ve looked at ‘GROSE’ graves & memorials at the Parish Church of Saint Gwinear in Cornwall.

How do these compare with all ‘GROSE’ burials recorded in Gwinear, listed on the Cornwall OPC Database? Is anyone else related to Matthew Grose (1788-1849) who migrated to the Isle of Man?

(Screenshot from Cornwall OPC Database: accessed 15th March, 2017)

Who’s who?

Working down the list in date order…

  • William Grose and Grace Grose are siblings both buried in 1818. Their grave is posted about here. They are the younger siblings of John Grose ‘the Perranuthnoe grocer’ and Matthew Grose ‘who migrated to Foxdale, Isle of Man’.
  • Samuel Grose buried 1825 and Eleanor Grose (nee Giddy) buried 1850, are the parents of ‘the famous engineer’ Samuel Grose. No photo of their grave yet. Can you help?
  • Matthew Grose buried 1853 is the younger brother of ‘the famous engineer’ Samuel Grose. No photo of Matthew’s grave yet. Can you help?
  • Jane Grose (nee Jennings) buried 1856 is the wife of John Grose ‘the Perranuthnoe grocer’ (younger brother of Matthew Grose ‘who migrated to Foxdale, Isle of Man’). Her grave is posted about here.
  • Samuel Grose (buried 1866) is ‘the famous engineer’and Nanny Grose (buried 1867), is Ann (nee Vivian), his wife. Their grave is posted about here.
  • Thomas Grose, buried 1885, not yet researched. Can you help?
  • Ruth Grose, buried 1890, not yet researched. Can you help?

Conclusion:

From the ten individuals buried in Gwinear, graves for half of them have been located, photographed, identified and discussed.

Eight of the individuals listed, (plus others, not buried, but on memorials) are related to our adventurous ancestor, Matthew Grose (1788-1849) who migrated to Foxdale, Isle of Man.

The final two, Ruth and Thomas Grose, might be related too, but they’re to be researched another day!

Next stop, back to the Isle of Man!!

Graves at St Gwinear: part 3: Samuel Grose junior (1791-1866)

The Grave of ‘the Most Scientific Engineer in Cornwall’!

At the Parish Church of Saint Gwinear in Cornwall, we have a very special grave to see.

The Grave:

Image of grave at St Gwinear Church, Cornwall © (Posted with permission of image owner: Fiona)

Transcription provided with photo:

SACRED
 
TO THE MEMORY OF
 
SAMUEL GROSE
 
OF THIS PARISH
 
WHO DIED 12th JUNE 1866
 
AGED 75 years.

ALSO ANN
 
HIS BELOVED WIFE
 
WHO DIED 15th MARCH 1867
 
AGED 77 years.


Sown in corruption raised in glory

What’s so interesting about these pair?

Samuel Grose junior (1791-1866) was called ‘the most scientific engineer in Cornwall’. He was a pupil of Richard Trevithick and employed around 1812 at Wheal Prosper to erect a high pressure engine. From his obituary we also discover…

He was engineer to some of the principal mines in Cornwall up to the time of his death.
In 1825 Mr. S. Grose first introduced clothing the cylinders, nozzles, steam pipes, &c., in an engine at Wheal Hope mine, and in 1827 he carried out his plans in an 80in. engine at Wheal Lowan mine; he also increased the pressure of steam there, obtaining from this engine a duty of 60,000,000. His engines were always characterised by a strict attention to detail, which displayed a keen discernment on the part of the designer.
We had the pleasure of his acquaintance, and much admired his kind disposition and unpretending manners. He lived not to astonish the world with very brilliant discoveries, but he “Did good by stealth and blushed to find it fame”, and left the world bequeathing to engineering science his improvements in the Cornish engine, which rank first in importance since the time of Trevithick and Wolf.

via Samuel Grose – Graces Guide

Family Connections:

Samuel junior was the son of Samuel Grose senior (1764-1825) who managed Dodington Copper Mines in Somerset and held positions at mines in Cornwall, including Wheal Alfred.

This makes him the nephew of Matthew Grose (1761-1824) who was a Mine Agent at Dodington Mines. Matthew’s memorial, also at Gwinear, is covered in this post.

Samuel Grose junior is the first cousin of John Grose (1793-1842), the grocer and draper from Goldsithney, Perranuthnoe, Cornwall who also has a memorial at Gwinear. On the photo (above), it can be seen in the background.

Likewise, Samuel Grose junior is the first cousin of Matthew Grose (1788-1849) who migrated to Foxdale, Isle of Man. This cousin was a Mine Agent at the Foxdale Mines from 1828-1846, before opening a ‘fine granite quarry’ near Foxdale.

Samuel Grose’s Will:

The details and date on his Will, match perfectly with those on the grave.

England & Wales, National Probate Calendar (Index of Wills and Administrations),1861-1941 Ancestry.com Online publication – Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. Original data – Principal Probate Registry. Calendar of the Grants of Probate and Letters of Administration made in the Probate Registries of the High Court of Justice in England. London

From the Cornwall OPC database we find Samuel’s burial at Gwinear:

Day Month 16-Jun
Year 1866
Parish Or Reg District Gwinear
Forename Samuel
Surname GROSE
Age 75
Residence Wall

Although it is well documented Samuel was born at Dodington or Nether Stowey in Somerset, whilst his father worked there, we don’t have a baptism record, yet.

Samuel’s wife, Ann Grose:

Anne [Ann, Nanny] Grose (nee Vivian) was the daughter of John Vivian and Mary Carne. No definite baptism record yet. From the census records she was born in London around 1791.

(There is a baptism record in Gwinear for Anna Vivian, baptised 16th Feb, 1796, daughter of John and Mary which may be worthy of further investigation).

From the Cornwall OPC Database, Samuel Grose “the younger” and Anne Vivian married 23rd July, 1812 at Gwinear. His rank/profession is given as ‘gentleman’ on the marriage record. The witnesses are John Vivian, (likely her father) and John Vivian junior, (likely her brother).

On the Cornwall OPC database,  see a burial for a ‘Nanny Grose’ in Gwinear that fits.

Day Month 20-Mar
Year 1867
Parish Or Reg District Gwinear
Forename Nanny
Surname GROSE
Age 77
Residence Wall

Also a match from the England & Wales, Civil Registration Death Index, 1837-1915

Name: Nanny Grose
Estimated birth year: abt 1790
Registration Year: 1867
Registration Quarter: Jan-Feb-Mar
Age at Death: 77
Registration district: Redruth


FreeBMD. England & Wales, Civil Registration Death Index, 1837-1915 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006.

Conclusion:

An ordinary looking grave for an extraordinary engineer and his wife!

From exploring the associated records we get confirmation that this is their grave. Both Samuel Grose junior and his wife Ann[e] were buried here at the Parish Church of St Gwinear, Cornwall.

In the next post, we’ll have a quick look at which other family graves or memorials we should expect to find here at Gwinear, Cornwall.

(Then back over to the Isle of Man!)

Graves at St Gwinear: part 2: John Grose (1793 – 1842)

Another Grave!

Still at the Parish Church of Saint Gwinear in Cornwall, we have another interesting grave/memorial to look at.

John Grose:

This time it’s John Grose (the younger brother of Matthew Grose (1788-1849) who migrated to the Isle of Man).

Image of grave at St Gwinear Church, Cornwall © (Posted with permission of image owner: Fiona)

Transcription provided with photo:

SACRED

TO

THE MEMORY OF

JOHN GROSE

Who departed this life on the

16th day of May

1842

Aged 49 years.

Also of

JANE GROSE

Wife of the above

Who departed this life on the

30th day of October

1856

Aged 50 years.

In love they lived, in peace they died

Their lives was craved but God denied.

ALSO OF

EDWARD JENNINGS

Who died June 23rd 1878

Aged 54 years

He died trusting in his saviour.

What do we know about John Grose?

John Grose is the son of Captain Matthew Grose (1761-1824) whose Memorial is also at Gwinear and details covered in this other post.

According to the 1841 census (below) and also his 1842 Will, John Grose was a grocer and draper in Goldsithney, Perranuthnoe, Cornwall.

(Source: Class: HO107; Piece: 143; Book: 11; Civil Parish: Perran Ulthnoe; County: Cornwall; Enumeration District: 6; Folio: 27; Page: 22; Line: 15; GSU roll: 241265 (Census Returns of England and Wales, 1841; Ancestry.com Operations, Inc; 2010; Provo, UT, USA))

We don’t have a baptism record for John Grose yet, but from his grave we can estimate his birth around 1793.

This fits with the Cornwall Memorial Inscription record on FindMyPast.

First name(s) JOHN
Last name GROSE
Age 49
Birth year 1793
Death year 1842
Death date May 1842
Place GWINEAR

 

Also the England & Wales Deaths 1837-2007 record on FindMyPast

Death quarter 2
Death year 1842
District Penzance
County Cornwall
Volume 9
Page 152

 

Although we have this Memorial Inscription and death record, we don’t yet have a burial record in Gwinear. Is this headstone indicating a burial place, or memorial for John Grose?

Captain?

Another question: He is titled as Captain John Grose on his mother’s obituary.

“At Goldsithney, in Perranuthnoe, on the 23rd instant, at the house of her son, Capt. John Grose, Mrs. Jane Grose, aged 80 years, relict of the late Capt. Matthew Grose, formerly of Gwinear, and of Dodington in Somerset, much regretted and respected by her numerous family and friends. Her end was peace.”

Was he a retired ‘Mine Captain’, or another type of ‘Captain’?

His Will

His Will (transcription ongoing) looks like a an excellent resource of information as mentions some provision for his four living siblings:

“Mary, wife of Mine Agent, Henry Francis”…

“Elizabeth wife of Mine Agent, Obadiah Ash”…

“Eliza, wife of Mine Agent, Absalom Francis.” …

“the children of my brother Captain Matthew Grose as shall be then living.”…



(The National Archives; Kew, England; Prerogative Court of Canterbury and Related Probate Jurisdictions: Will Registers; Class: PROB 11; Piece: 1966)

What do we know about Jane Grose?

According to the marriage record of John Grose and Jane Jennings on 26th January, 1840 from the Cornwall OPC Database, Jane Grose (nee Jennings) is from Gwinear and daughter of Thomas Jennings, a farmer.

With further research on the Cornwall OPC Database, we see Jane’s mother is likely Ann Jennings (nee Hambly). Ann Hambly and Thomas Jennings married in Gwinear in 1802.

We don’t see a baptism in Gwinear for a Jane Jennings, but we have a record for Jennifer Jennings to parents ‘Thomas and Anne Jennings’ which looks like the best match for her.

Day Month 08-Feb
Year 1807
Parish Or Reg District Gwinear
Forename Jennifer
Surname JENNINGS
Sex dau
Father Forename Thomas
Mother Forename Anne

..

From Cornwall OPC database we have a burial record for Jane Grose in 1856 in Gwinear which corresponds with the grave.

What do we know about Edward Jennings?

Edward Jennings is the younger brother of Jane Grose (nee Jennings).

The details of his death match closely with those on the Cornwall OPC Database:

Day Month 27-Jun
Year 1878
Parish Or Reg District Gwinear
Forename Edward
Surname JENNINGS
Age 53
Residence Village

His baptism details from Cornwall OPC Database:

Day Month 27-Jun
Year 1824
Parish Or Reg District Gwinear
Forename Edward
Surname JENNINGS
Sex son
Father Forename Thomas
Mother Forename Ann
Residence Gwinear
Father Rank Profession Farmer


Phew (again)!

So once again a few questions answered & as usual a few more things to find out! Please comment or contact if any errors, or have advice or info.

The next post will look at a third interesting gravestone at St Gwinear, Cornwall. Then we’ll go back over to the Isle of Man!

Useful links:

Cornwall OPC Database