“Two Men of Very Different Minds”: Escapades of Cornish Mine Captain brothers, Matthew and Samuel Grose, from 1786 to 1824

This post covers the mining escapades of two brothers, Matthew and Samuel Grose born in Redruth Cornwall in the 1760’s and worked at mines in Somerset and Cornwall. They were first written about here.

Recap:

Matthew Grose (1761-1824) is the father of Matthew Grose (1788-1849) who moved to be Captain at Foxdale Mines, Isle of Man.

His brother, Samuel Grose (1764-1825) is the father of ‘the famous engineer’ Samuel Grose junior (1791-1866) who was a pupil of Richard Trevithick and designer of the Cornish engine.

..

Introduction:

After reading these four fantastic books, extra info has been gathered:

  • “Men & Mining on the Quantocks” (Second edition) by J.R. Hamilton and J.F. Lawrence
  • “News from Cornwall” by A.K. Hamilton Jenkin
  • “Mines and Miners of Cornwall (Hayle, Gwinear & Gwithian)” by A.K. Hamilton Jenkin
  • “The Historic Landscape of the Quantock Hills” by Hazel Riley (free: here)

The details about Matthew and Samuel Grose in the books are mostly sourced from letters written and received by William Jenkin of Redruth in Cornwall (1738-1820).

William Jenkin looked after the mining interests of the Marquis of Buckingham in Cornwall and developed mining on the Marquis’s Dodington Estate in Somerset.

William Jenkin had a close friendship with Samuel Grose, but an antagonistic relationship with Matthew Grose and this is reflected in his letters. The books interpret this accordingly – hailing sensitive Samuel Grose ‘a Cornish artisan’  whilst outspoken Matthew Grose is deemed the ‘less reputable, impulsive brother’!

Most of the ‘quotes in italics’ in the following timeline are brief extracts from their extensive correspondence with William Jenkin.

“Two Men of Very Different Minds”: 1786-1824

CORNWALL TO SOMERSET:

1786: At the age of 25, Matthew Grose leaves Cornwall for Somerset, boldly claiming he is ‘the first miner introduced to seek for Copper at Dodington’ [in recent times]. Matthew begins mining work with a few Cornish Miners on Dodington Common in Somerset. He is then established at the Garden Mine at Dodington in a supervisory capacity.

Relations between the Cornish Miners and locals of Somerset are delicate. Jenkins writes that the local ‘inhabitants seem quite disposed to be offended’.

Matthew’s staff now consists of coal miners from Radstock, Somerset, but he finds them unmanageable and wishes to replace them with Cornishmen, but William Jenkin refuses.

Matthew Grose is overly enthusiastic and unwisely gives the Marquis of Buckingham an exaggerated impression of the value of the veins discovered in Dodington. This annoys William Jenkin and his opinion of Matthew wavers.

1788: Matthew Grose moves sideways to be Captain at the Marquis of Buckingham’s Mine at Loxton, on the Mendip Hills. (His son, Matthew Grose (1788-1849) – is baptised at the Parish church of St. Andrew’s here).

loxton.jpg

Parish church of St. Andrew’s, Loxton © Copyright John Baker and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

1791: Whilst Matthew is in Loxton, his brother, Samuel Grose is appointed senior Mine Captain at Dodington. Some Cornish miners in his employ return to Redruth and it is difficult to attract others to Somerset because ‘the spirit of Mining is high in Cornwall’. Jenkin asks Samuel Grose to give any remaining Cornishmen proper encouragement to stay, or ‘get some of the Somerset young men to become handy’.

Samuel’s ‘famous engineer’ son, Samuel Grose junior (1791-1866) is born at Nether Stowey, Somerset.

1793: The French First Republic declares war on Britain.

1794: Josiah Holdship comes to Somerset seeking the mineral ’emery’. He approaches Matthew Grose at Loxton first, who sends him on to Samuel Grose in Dodington.

1795: Samuel Grose resides at Newhall, near Dodington which has a:

colony of unpleasant neighbours… the most profligate and abandoned part of mankind’.

Matthew Grose is still at the Loxton Mine and similarly writes about the:

“…ill-natured prejudice in the behaviour of the inhabitants at Loxton and it’s vicinity against suffering any but themselves to inhabit the county.”

Matthew seems at his wits end about:

“…tenants as could accommodate Shippam Miners with lodging and would not do it.”

1796: Spain declares war on Britain.

1797: A French invasion of Britain is rumoured. Samuel Grose writes that:

‘I cannot think that the French will come here, but I think they will ruin our country by threatening to come.’

The French briefly invade at Fishguard.

1798: William Jenkin holds shares in Wheal Alfred Mine in Cornwall (named after his son).

1799: There is crisis in the copper trade as prices fall.

1800: Samuel Grose’s spirits fall too. Partly due to the imminent failure of the Dodington mine (a pump is desperately required) and also due to the ‘enormous advanced price of the necessities of life’. Poverty has become extreme in Somerset and Cornwall for working people, including miners.

After a woman (about to be arrested for theft) hangs herself in Samuel Grose’s garden, he writes:

“Glad should I be if circumstances should alter so that my removal was nigh from such bad people and such a disagreeable house as Newhall is at this time. I do not believe we can live there. Let the consequence be what it will.”

and

“I would not have my children frightened by this shocking affair, not for all the Gold in the Universe.”

newhall

Ruined building at New Hall. © Copyright Nick Chipchase and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

Samuel desires to move to the Counting House in Dodington (the mine company’s headquarters), but understands ‘it would require £20 to fit it for a dwelling’. Also the mine is unprofitable and closure inevitable.

1801: Jenkin writes to a friend about Samuel Grose:

“…poor Capt. Grose appears to be falling back again. His doctors seem to think that his native air might be of service to him. In that case I could take him back to Cornwall with me, after going to Dodington to supervise the closure of the mine.”

Jenkin also writes directly to Samuel:

“Thou shall not want for anything that I can command or procure – therefore write me freely as one Friend should to another”

Jenkin makes plans to install Samuel as Captain at Wheal Alfred Mine back in Cornwall.

He writes to Samuel (about Wheal Alfred Mine and Matthew Grose):

“Thy brother Matthew had set his mind on this appointment for himself but the preference is given to thee. I hope for the sake of his Family that a place will be found by and for him also, but I am sorry to observe that poor Matthew does not make many friends amongst those who would be most likely to have power to serve him. He is too great a talker and too full of himself. A little disappointment may probably be in the ordering of Providence…”

and

“The mine which Matthew is in is likely to go down. I wish he had so good an opening for future employment as thou hast – but he has not thy abilities to recommend him.”

After fourteen years, mining at Dodington ceases in 1801, with Samuel Grose and a dozen men departing. William Jenkin laments about the ‘scattered bunches of rich ore’ and supposes that at a deeper level it will be more ‘regular and collected’. A powerful steam engine is required to work the deeper, richer veins, but no investment is forthcoming.

Also in 1801, change is afoot internationally as the fighting with France dwindles and a peaceful conclusion draws near. Jenkins writes:

“After the scourge of War and famine which has long threatened the inhabitants of this land, this is the method that they take to manifest their thankfulness for so great a deliverance. Illuminations, Shouting, Bawling, Huzzaing, Cursing, Drinking, Squibbs, rockets and fire balloons are poured out and scattered through Earth and Air, while the poor and needy are neglected and forgotten.”

BACK IN CORNWALL

1802: The Treaty of Amiens temporarily ends hostilities between the French Republic and Britain.

1803: Now back in Cornwall, Samuel Grose is in better spirits as Captain at Wheal Alfred Mine with an engine. “The water is very quick… but I believe we shall be able to endure… I have now a better opinion of Wheal Alfred than I ever had.”

1804: Spain declares war on Britain (again)

1805: Thomas Poole from Nether Stowey in Somerset considers promoting a reopening of the Buckingham Mine at Dodington. (Thomas Poole is a great friend of the poets Samuel Taylor Coleridge and William Wordsworth and for some time they reside closely) .

1806: The eminent inventor and chemist, Humphry Davy is approached for capital and geological advice regarding the peculiar shell limestone formations in Dodington. He responds advising that:

Miners from Alston Moor and Derbyshire would understand your Country [mines] better than Cornish miners.’

Humphry Davy declines to ‘adventure’ (invest in the mines) because he is saving to embark on a scientific expedition to Norway, Lapland and Sweden.

Pottery mogul Josiah Wedgwood II is also approached to invest, but he’s averse to adventuring money on Somerset Copper mining.

However, the high price of copper attracts interest from other investors and mining again at the Buckingham Mine in Dodington becomes a possibility.

1807: Thomas Poole meets with William Jenkin and Samuel Grose for advice on mining matters. Samuel won’t be persuaded back to Somerset as he is now the Mine Agent at ‘a truly great copper mine’ (Wheal Alfred in Cornwall). Jenkin advises that Samuel Grose might be able to give direction by travelling to Somerset three or four times a year. Jenkin does not get directly involved either, however remains as an active well-wisher and helps recruit Cornish miners for the venture in Somerset.

1808: Thomas Poole travels to Cornwall again to see ‘the mines and gigantic machinery employed about them.’  Jenkin doesn’t meet with him – now weary of the Somerset men merely talking about mining, with no action.

1810: Sweden declares war on Britain

1811: Ardent Methodist, Samuel Grose and John Davey (Mine Agents) begin a Sunday School at Wheal Alfred for 250 to 300 children after observing the:

“…profligacy of the Children of many Labourers in that Mine, -and particularly of those who cannot read.”

1812: William Jenkins writes:

“There is too much Copper bringing to Market for the demand”

and of the Anglo-American war of 1812:

“The American War is a great Evil to the Mining Interest in Cornwall. The price of Copper has been gradually declining as the prospect of Peace receded.”

1814: Proposals are made for reworking Herland Mines near Gwinear. According to William Jenkin, his old nemesis, Matthew Grose, has written “a great, blown-up prospectus” .

“Matthew Grose does not, in my opinion, possess that solid Judgement nor that thinking deliberate turn of mind which I consider an essential ingredient to make a Captain fit to direct so weighty an undertaking. One who can indulge himself in what he calls good living so as to become even now unable to go to the bottom of Wheal Alfred, shall not be the Captain of my choice. I do not think he is truly careful of speaking honestly and truly so as to give his employers clear and honest answers to their enquiries – in short he is not Sam, but Matthew Grose – two men of very different minds.”

1815: Matthew Grose and Richard Nicholls proudly return from London with a long list of Adventurers prepared to invest in the Herland Mines. They specify certain conditions about how they are to be paid. They’ve also discovered a shallow level of Silver in the mine that was overlooked in the former working.

William Jenkin grumbles:

“How it may turn out is past my judgement to say – but I don’t feel very sanguine [optimistic] about it.”

Whilst things are possibly looking up for Matthew Grose, his brother Samuel Grose has been under pressure and has run up a debt of £12,000 on Wheal Alfred because…

“…willing to comply with the clamorous demands of some of the Adventurers, [he] kept out of sight some heavy bills for coals, timber, and other articles in order to make dividends.”

Jenkin ‘trembles for the consequences’… should this mine go down’ with 1200 men, women and children employed there. He suggests it is the secret wish of some for Wheal Alfred to go down because it would cause copper prices to rise again.

1816: In February, Richard Trevithick’s famous, powerful pole-puffer engine is set to work at Herland Mines.

However, by October, Jenkin writes that:

“The Herland business has been so badly managed that the Mine has been stopped for want of money.” 

200 labourers are turned idle.

“I wish it may be the last time that London adventurers become directors and managers of Cornish Mines.”

Meanwhile, Samuel Grose is called to write an account of the Buckingham Mine in Dodington, Somerset for newly interested adventurers, attracted by Thomas Poole again.

Also, 1816 was the year without a summer, with crop failure and food shortages across Britain and beyond. Welsh families became refugees, travelling and begging for food. Global temperatures had decreased by around 0.5°C, possibly due to a volcanic eruption in the East Indies the previous year.

1817: Things seem to have gone from bad to worse in Cornwall. Jenkin writes that:

“The two Parishes of Phillack and Gwinear are very populous, chiefly Miners, and are, I believe, more distressed than any other district in this County, for there is not now one Mine in either of the parishes to give employment to them.”

BACK TO SOMERSET

1817-1820 A new shaft is sunk and an engine-house is erected at Beech Grove, behind Dodington House in Somerset.

beechgrove.jpg

 Beech Grove Engine House © Copyright Nick Chipchase and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

1820: After an absence of twenty seven years, Matthew Grose returns as Mine Captain to Dodington. He supervises the installation of a Boulton & Watt engine in the Beech Grove house.

Shortly afterwards, Matthew requests that the engine be removed from Beech Grove and re-erected at the Sump (Glebe) Shaft to cope with an influx of water.

Matthew Grose writes to John Price on 25 February 1820…

“I am happy to inform you for his Lordship’s information that our prospects in the mine is very good…”

and

“The great increase of water is not a bad symptom, its generally found in all mines the more water, the more ore. I believe shares in this mine may be got at a very easy rate as the pockets of some of the adventurers is very much exhausted, and will not well be able to encounter the expense of removing the engine.”

Disputes arise between various shareholders with the Marquis of Buckingham pressing for a revision of terms and other Adventurers wanting to suspend operations as costs mount. Thomas Poole exercises proxy votes for his friends, forcing the minority to continue. He remains in control for another year.

The engine is moved to the Glebe Engine House as per Matthew Grose’s request. Although good quality copper ore is raised, the mine remains unprofitable.

glebe2.jpg

Glebe Engine House © Copyright Chris Andrews and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

The Marquis is offended. He strongly opposed the moving of the engine because it would no longer be on his land, so in the event of closure he will find it harder to secure new adventurers (investors). He blames Matthew Grose (as Mine Captain) for orchestrating the manoeuvre.

Matthew Grose now faces impending closure of the uneconomical mine, loss of earnings and the wrath of an antagonistic Marquis.

Matthew writes to the Estate Steward:

“I have learned with some concern that I am discredited with you… for removing the engine without his Lordship’s leave for doing so… I hope no blame can possibly be attached to me.”

Matthew Grose then goes onto explain his many technical and economic reasons for moving the engine from Beech Grove to the Glebe House and the unavoidable costs involved.

The Marquis’s wrath continues as he expresses more displeasure – he’d been told there were manganese deposits in his mine at Dodington, but these have proved non-existent.

Matthew Grose tries to explain a convoluted catalogue of errors (including an adventurer dying en-route to the mines). He insists the lack of manganese isn’t his fault and blames Richard Symes for mixing up samples of ore:

“Mr Symes says now, the samples he sent must have come from Loxton” [not Dodington]

In August 1820, Matthew tries to restore relations with the Marquis by sending him a box of mineral specimens:

“…esteemed valuable acquisitions…. better collected for a grotto than the cabinet.”

1821: Work ceases at the uneconomical Buckingham Mine in Dodington after an expenditure of £20,000 and paltry sales of ore of £2,500.

Matthew Grose writes to the Marquis, saying he recommended the:

Company to stop the mine altogether rather than continue to work with it in a paltry way. “

He also says:

“I believe that no company that was engaged in mining business was so completely ignorant of the principles of mining, as the Buckingham Mining Company, nor no mine was ever worked in such a shily-shaly way.”

Matthew’s comments about his employer result in his dismissal from the company. He laments:

‘…this extraordinary and unexpected event originated from the belief that I am more inclined to serve his Lordship than the company; though what produced this belief, I know not’

Matthew Grose is instructed to leave the house where he and his family live. No wages are to be paid until he’s complied.

Stubbornly, he remains in residence and becomes captain at a small mine 25 miles west of Dodington (likely Luccombe, or similar in the Alcombe-Wootton Courtenay district).

Matthew Grose writes letters to Thomas Crawford, pleading for employment at the Dodington Mine:

‘no person knows the mine as well as myself’

Crawford responds that:

‘You were the company’s servant and as they have suspended working the mine and do not choose to continue you in their service, I do not know in what way I could help you.’

Matthew Grose is not easily silenced and in June 1821, he indignantly writes to Thomas Crawford again:

‘what right has the company to sell gravel from the mine and carry off so much without making acknowledgement to his Lordship?’

and

‘I keep the keys of the counting house, the office and materials house… A small stipend [salary] with the little I receive from the mine in the west will serve to keep my head above water. I ask no more till it is settled.’

In September, five months after his dismissal, Matthew is offered his wages, only payable up until when the mine had ceased work. He rejects the offer, demanding his salary right up until September. He also rejects their demand that he pay rent on the house.

1822: In August the company surrenders the mining lease. Some adventurers remain interested and want to continue some operations. The Marquis obtains a new report on the mine from Alfred Jenkin and Captain Francis, but it is unfavourable and deters investors.

Matthew Grose remains steadfast and faithful to the mine, despite failing health and an empty pocket. He writes a new prospectus, desperately trying to promote for a new company to rework the Dodington mine. Refusing to return to Cornwall, he lingers on in poverty at Dodington.

1823: Matthew wins the interest of Charles Carne of Exeter who liaises with Matthew Grose’s son John.

Carne applies for a mining lease at the Buckingham Mines, Dodington, but struggles to agree terms.

1824: In February, Charles Carne arranges a meeting with interested parties at the Royal Inn in Bridgwater to raise capital for a new engine for Dodington. Unfortunately the meeting does not happen because Charles Carne has been imprisoned in Exeter ‘by means of a most unlucky adventure in a tin mine in Cornwall.’

According to the book, “Men & Mining on the Quantocks (by J.R. Hamilton and J.F. Lawrence)”, Matthew Grose dies as a ‘starving pauper’ in ‘grinding poverty’ and is buried at Dodington Churchyard on 11 May 1824.

This date concurs with Matthew’s burial record in 1824 and the information from his Memorial which was erected in Gwinear, Cornwall.

Conclusion:

Matthew and Samuel Grose’s mining adventures (and misadventures) show the struggle between the reality of mining economics and the optimism of miners.

In the book, “The Historic Lanscape of the Quantock Hills”, Archaeologist, Hazel Riley pays tribute to Matthew Grose’s final bold project:

“The Glebe engine house survives virtually intact to its original roof level. The scatter of red tile fragments around its base shows that it originally had a tiled roof. A large infilled shaft, some 16m in diameter, lies to the south of the engine house and spoil heaps lie to the east. The thick bob wall was on the southeast, the cylinder opening, with a brick arch, was in the northwest wall. Some good quality copper ore was raised from these deeper levels: 100 tons of ore from the Buckingham mines was sampled and shipped from Combwich in 1820 when it was described as ‘rich and of prime quality’ (Hamilton and Lawrence 1970, 62). The engine houses are remarkable testaments to the business acumen of Tom Poole and the practical enthusiasm of Matthew Grose, the mine captain. The Glebe engine house is the oldest intact beam engine house in southwest England (Stanier 2003).”

glebe

Glebe Engine House and ruined Miners’ Store © Copyright Nick Chipchase and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

Resources and Further Reading:

Books:

  • “Men & Mining on the Quantocks” (Second edition) by J.R. Hamilton and J.F. Lawrence
  • “News from Cornwall” by A.K. Hamilton Jenkin
  • “Mines and Miners of Cornwall (Hayle, Gwinear & Gwithian)” by A.K. Hamilton Jenkin
  • “The Historic Landscape of the Quantock Hills” by Hazel Riley (free: here See pages 148-150)

Websites:

As always, please comment or make contact about this post!

The career of Captain Matthew Grose (1819 – 1887)

Born in Cornwall, Captain Matthew Grose (1819-1887) was a renowned Mining Engineer in the Isle of Man. He managed Ballacorkish Mines on the island and also inspected many others, too numerous to cover in one post.

He was a mining man through and through. His father, also called Matthew Grose (1788 – 1849), born in Loxton, Somerset, was a Mine Agent who worked in Cornwall, then at Foxdale Mines, Isle of Man from 1828-1846, before opening a ‘fine granite quarry’.

His grandfather, another Matthew Grose (1761 – 1824) and great uncle, Samuel Grose (1764 – 1825) were Cornish Mine Captains born in Redruth, who worked at mines in Cornwall and Somerset.

More information about his family can be found here.


Photo of Matthew Grose 1819-1887 (Courtesy of Manx National Heritage)

1819 Matthew was baptised at Phillack, Cornwall on 19th March, 1819.

1828: At the age of nine, Matthew moved to the Isle of Man where his father becomes a Mine Agent at Foxdale Mines.

1841: The census shows Matthew is living and working at Foxdale Mines with his father who is the Mine Agent there. Matthew is working as a miner and his brothers, Thomas and John are engineers. Later that year he married Anne Weston Read.

1846: Slater’s Directory (Douglas) lists Captain Mathew Grose as the Agent to the Foxdale Mining Co. Adress given as Moore’s court, Market place. This is his father, but undoubtably both were still working closely. This is the year his father was dramatically dismissed from Foxdale Mines. The Crown Agent, John Taylor, then stepped in and gave him setts of land & he opened a fine granite quarry.

1846-1851: At some point adventuring, exploration and lead mining begins at Ballacorkish (Rushen Mines) on the hillside above Colby.

1851: The census shows Matthew Grose residing at Ballagawne in Rushen with wife, Annie, four of his children and a house servant. His occupation is given as Agent of Mines.

 1852: The Brig Lily is shipwrecked on the islet of Kitterland. The following morning a salvage team go to save the cargo, but the gunpowder aboard explodes. Miners at Ballacorkish have their candles go out and are thrown over by the force of the explosion.


Manx Sun, Saturday, January 01, 1853; Page: 12

1855: Limited lead mining operations are still ongoing at Ballacorkish.

ballacorkish 1855

Mona’s Herald, Wednesday, April 11, 1855; Page: 7

1856: Captain Matthew Grose supervises all mines in the parish of Rushen

Manx Sun, Saturday, February 23, 1856; Page: 4, Courtesy of Manx National Heritage

1857: Matthew Grose inspects Peel Castle Mines



Manx Sun, Saturday, December 19, 1857; Page: 23

1861: The census shows Matthew Grose residing at Ballacorkish in Rushen with wife, Annie, eight of his children and a house servant. His occupation is given as Lead and Copper Mine Agent.

1862: In April, newspapers report on The South Foxdale Silver Lead Mining Company offering shares to purchase

“the lease of an extensive sett of richly mineralised property…”

And

“The sett having recently been surveyed by eminent mining engineers — Captain R. Rowe of the Laxey; Captain M. Grose, Isle of Man, whose report is endorsed…”

Mona’s Herald, Wednesday, April 16, 1862; Page: 4


Manx Sun, Saturday, April 19, 1862; Page: 12

The Manx Mines website states:

Work resumed when the mines were reopened in 1862 and developed on two lodes. Two shafts had been sunk 600 yards apart and the sett was worked as two separate mines which were known simply as North and South with no connections being made underground. The North, or Phosphate shaft (Rushen mine) was sunk to a depth of 360 feet (60 fathoms) with levels at 15, 30, 45 and 60 fathoms. The bottom levels were driven for 180 feet south and 780 feet north. The South shaft  (Ballacorkish) was sunk to a depth of 450 feet (75 fathoms) with levels driven at 12, 24, 36, 60 and the bottom at 75 fathoms which had been driven to a length of 390 feet south and 1470 feet north. Both mines had to pump water out at the rate of about thirty gallons per minute but an adit level driven from the main road also helped to drain the mine and reduce the pumping cost.

Extract from: http://www.manxmines.com/BALLACORKISH.htm

1863: Thwaites Directory (Rushen) lists Captain Matthew Grose as the manager of South Foxdale Mines (Ballacorkish).

The South Foxdale Silver-Lead Mining Company have recently been established for the working of a set of mines lying south of the Foxdale mines. The set includes the Ballacorkish Mine and is upwards of four miles in extent. The capital of the company is £25,000 raised in shares of £6 each. The works comprise an edit level driven about 300 fathoms, which has yielded a considerable quantity of lead ore and blonde. About 200 fathoms from the entrance is a large east and west lode, from which, within a very small space, a cargo of rich silver ore was raised. About 80 fathoms in advance of this edit, two shafts have been sunk about 20 fathoms deep, and several parcels of ore raised; and a few fathoms from the present end of edit, several lumps of ore near the surface have been found in an east and west direction, yielding from 60 to 60 ounces of silver to the ton of ore.

Also, 

“Captain Grose… has for years past entertained a high opinion of the property”


Mona’s Herald, Wednesday, July 01, 1863; Page: 2, Courtesy of Manx National Heritage

1863: Matthew is involved with other mining operations on the island.

LEAD MINE AT KERROW – MOAR , LEZAYRE .— Some two years ago a company commenced operations in search of the metal in this district, and after bestowing considerable labour and expense , were so ill remunerated for their outlay and trouble that the project was by them abandoned. Not discouraged, however, by a past failure , a new company has been formed, and a number of miners and labourers are now engaged in sinking a shaft and making other necessary preparations for searching for hidden treasures. The new company have not taken to the old working, but opened a new one a little higher up the hill, though in the immediate neighbourhood of the old mine. We bave been informed, on reliable authority, that they have already, during their progress, obtained large Quantities of ore, with encouraging prospects before them. Under the mining skill of Captain Grose, there is no doubt that the resources of this new mine will be fully developed; and if successful ia the enterprise, it will prove a great boon to the labouring classes of this locality.”

Mona’s Herald, Wednesday, December 16, 1863; Page: 3

1868: Mining operations are going well at Ballacorkish.


Isle of Man Times, Saturday, May 09, 1868; Page: 6

His wife Anne died in May 1868.

He takes out a notice in the newspaper to state that he won’t be responsible for debts contracted by others.


Isle of Man Times, Saturday, June 13, 1868; Page: 8

In September 1868 he marries his second wife, a widow, Elizabeth Luff (nee Qualtrough).

In October 1868, two of his sons are in bother for stealing apples. Matthew Grose is referred to as:

“…the well-known manager of the Ballacorkish Mines, who is respected and beloved by all who know him.”

Mona’s Herald, Wednesday, October 14, 1868; Page: 3 (Courtesy of Manx National Heritage)

1870: Matthew issues several reports on progress at Ballacorkish.


Isle of Man Times, Saturday, January 29, 1870; Page: 3


Isle of Man Times, Saturday, February 12, 1870; Page: 3


Isle of Man Times, Saturday, April 09, 1870; Page: 3


Isle of Man Times, Saturday, April 23, 1870; Page: 3


Image of Ballacorkish Mines © (Posted with permission of image owner: Rob Cannell, Isle of Man)

1870 proves a dramatic year at Ballacorkish. Very shortly after the mining updates it appears in the newspapers that…

“some fresh arrangements have taken place”

and

“Major Thorpe who holds a large number of shares in the mines has taken the sole management of this important undertaking”

and

“Some slight difficulties arose in the fresh management of the affairs.”

The ‘slight difficulties’ being that Major Thorpe made allegations that five young men (including some relatives of Captain Grose) had threatened to “Cook his Goose” and shoot him!



Manx Sun, Saturday, May 14, 1870; Section: Front page, Page: 1

But was it fake news?

Isle of Man Times, Saturday, June 18, 1870; Page: 3

1871: The England census shows Matthew Grose (Mine Agent) with his second wife Elizabeth (nee Qualtrough). He is in Pontesbury, Shropshire, England visiting his older sister Emma Harrison (nee Grose) who is wife of Jonathan Harrison (Mine Agent).

He is also on the 1871 Isle of Man census at Ballakilpatrick road, Rushen with occupation given as Agent Lead Mines.

1872: Matthew Grose inspects a mine at Dalby, Isle of Man.


13 April 1872 – Isle of Man Times – Douglas, Isle of Man

1873: Newspapers report on the issuing of a prospectus for the Colby Mining Company limited

 “for working silver lead mining properties in the Isle of Man, covering nearly 400 acres in the parish of Arboury. Capt. Rowe, of the Great Laxey Mines; Capt. Bowden formerly of the Foxdale Mine; and Capt. Grose formerly of the Ballacorkish Mine all report very favourably of the prospects of the mine.”


1875: Matthew Grose is appointed manager again. 

“…a more competent gentleman can scarcely be found.”

 


Isle of Man Times, 13 March, 1875

1880: Matthew seems to be in some financial difficulties with his goods and effects being sold off.


Mona’s Herald, Wednesday, April 28, 1880; Page: 8

1881: The census shows him at The Level, Rushen with wife and children. He is Captain of Lead Mines, unemployed.

1886: Matthew Grose is ill and residing at Ballakillowey.


Isle of Man Examiner, Saturday, March 13, 1886; Page: 4

1887: Matthew passes away at Ballavayre (or Beal-e-Vere in the newspaper).

Manx Sun, Saturday, October 22, 1887; Page: 13, Courtesy of Manx National Heritage

Conclusion:

These are just a handful of the references to Matthew Grose’s long mining career on the Isle of Man. In future posts, specific aspects might be revisited and discussed in more detail.

Thanks’, Resources and Further Reading:

Many thanks to iMuseum Newspapers & Publications  for providing digital access to the Isle of Man newspapers (from 1792 to 1960). Images and text are shared on this blog in accordance with their policy of using & sharing for ‘non-commercial personal use’.

Also thanks to fellow researcher, Rob Cannell – between us we’ve found plenty of newspaper clippings!

http://www.manxmines.com/BALLACORKISH.htm

https://www.aditnow.co.uk/mines/Ballacorkish-Lead-Mine-2/

https://www.aditnow.co.uk/Album/Photographs-Of-Ballacorkish_62848/

http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/record?catid=5641891&catln=6

http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/C4800471

Graves at St Gwinear: part 1: Matthew Grose (1761 – 1824)

Thanks Fiona in England & Rob on the Isle of Man. They’ve provided all sorts of extra info & photos. Currently working through & (with their permission) will incorporate into forthcoming posts.

Now… Over to Cornwall!

Quick recap:

Before covering the career of Captain Matthew Grose (1819 – 1887) on the Isle of Man, we’re going for a change of scenery. Back over to Cornwall & Somerset where his grandfather lived & died.

You’ll recall his grandfather was also called Captain Matthew Grose (1761 – 1824) & was the brother of Samuel Grose senior (1764 – 1825). Both baptised in Redruth, Cornwall.

They’re on documents as Mine Captains running Dodington Copper Mines in Somerset for many years. In 1788 we see these two brothers on a mining venture in Loxton, Somerset & both baptising their children there, at the parish church of St. Andrew.

They worked at mines in both Somerset & Cornwall. This other blog post covers their careers & family in more detail.

This Matthew Grose (1761-1824) is the father of Matthew Grose (1788-1849) – who migrated to Foxdale, Isle of Man with his wife & children in 1828.

Graves at St Gwinear:

One of many ‘Wow!’ moments this week was receiving photos of graves, memorials & transcriptions from family history researcher, Fiona. She’s kindly given permission for these to be posted here on the blog.

Each grave will be written about on a separate post, because they all contain key pieces of information.

The Parish Church of Saint Gwinear, Cornwall:

The small village of Gwinear sits on a hill overlooking the Angarrack valley. It’s about three kilometres east of Hayle, Cornwall. There were many mines in the area.

Image of St Gwinear Church, Cornwall © (Posted with permission of image owner: Fiona)

 
At the church there are four main churchyard areas. According to the church website, during 2017, a project is ongoing – to research, record & map ALL burials & memorials there. It’ll be interesting to revisit these records at a later date.

Photograph of Matthew Grose’s Memorial:

Image of Memorial in Gwinear, Cornwall © (Posted with permission of image owner: Fiona)

Transcription provided with photo:

SACRED

To memory of

Captain Matthew Grose

Who died in Doddington in

Sommersetshire the 24th day

Of August 1824 aged 63 years.

And Jane his wife, who died

April 28th 1841 Aged 80 years.

Also William their son who

Died the 1st day of April 1818

Aged 21 years.

And Grace their daughter

Who died February 20th 1818

Aged 19 years.

Firstly, Matthew Grose:

The above transcription shows this as a memorial for Captain Matthew Grose who died in Dodington, Somerset on 24th August 1824 age 63.

The West Somerset Parish Register Transcriptions show his burial record in Dodington as:

Matthew Grose, 11th May, 1824, age 64.

On Findmypast, the Cornwall FHS memorial transcription from Gwinear gives the information as Mathew Grose, 21st August 1821, age 63.

Some slight differences in these records & transcriptions, but nothing too drastic! Confident all refer to same individual.

His wife, Jane Grose:

This transcription gives her information as April 28th 1841, Aged 80 years

This compares closely with her obituary from April 1841:

At Goldsithney, in Perranuthnoe, on the 23rd instant, at the house of her son, Capt. John Grose, Mrs. Jane Grose, aged 80 years, relict of the late Capt. Matthew Grose, formerly of Gwinear, and of Dodington in Somerset, much regretted and respected by her numerous family and friends. Her end was peace.

On Findmypast…

The memorial transcription also gives the information as Jane Grose, age 80, death date 28th April 1841.

Assume this is her death index record (from England & Wales Deaths 1837-2007) because Goldsithney is in the district of Penzance. It shows:

Jane Grose: Death quarter 2, 1841, Penzance, Volume 9, Page 126

William Grose:

The transcription above says died the 1st day of April 1818 Aged 21 years.

On FindMyPast…

Memorial transcription gives 17th April, 1818, Age 21

Burial transcription at Gwinear: 3rd April, 1818, Age 19.

Checking his baptism transcription, we see William Grose baptised in Gwinear on 27th December 1801 to parents Matthew and Jennifer Grose. This is reassuring that the ‘theory’ of Jennifer and Jane being the same person is holding up.

Grace Grose:

This transcription gives February 20th 1818. Aged 19 years.

On FindMyPast…

Memorial transcription: 20th February 1818, Age 19

Burial transcription: 21st February 1818, Age 17

Checking her baptism transcription, we see Grace Grose baptised in Gwinear on 27th December 1801 to parents Matthew and Jennifer Grose. At the same time as her brother, William – again ‘evidence’ that Jennifer and Jane are the same person.

Is Matthew’s wife, Jane or Jennifer Grose?

Apparently Jenny was originally a common ‘nickname’ for Jane. Perhaps that’s why her name varies on records as Jane, Jenefer, Jennifer, Gennifer etc. No marriage record has been found for a Matthew and Jennifer Grose – only Matthew and Jane.

Who’s actually buried here?

  • Their children? Probably. Both age 20-ish, William and Grace, have burial records in 1818 for Gwinear, so are likely buried here. How sad (and strange) that they were baptised at the same time & died within a few months of each other. Coincidence? Illness? An accident?

Their older brother, (our Matthew Grose (1788-1849)), would likely have attended this burial service in 1818. He was still in the Hayle/Phillack area (baptising own children, Mary in 1817 and Matthew in 1819).

  • Matthew Grose? No, this is a memorial for him. His burial record is in Dodington, Somerset. 1821 or 1824? Is there a gravestone in Dodington (All Saints Church?) in addition to this Memorial in Gwinear?

Our Matthew Grose (1788-1849)), might have attended this burial in Dodington, Somerset in 1824. He was in Dodington in 1821 (baptising son, Thomas). Also his son, John, was born (in ‘England’) around 1824.

  • Jane Grose (nee Williams)? Possibly. No burial record found yet for Jane. She could be buried here in Gwinear with her children. She died in April 1841 in Goldsithney, Perranuthnoe (Penzance district).

Phew!

So a few questions answered & few more things to find out! As always, please comment or contact if spot any errors, or have useful advice or info.

The next post will look at another interesting gravestone at St Gwinear, Cornwall.

Further reading and useful research sites:

www.findmypast.com

www.ancestry.co.uk

http://www.opc-cornwall.org/Par_new/e_g/gwinear.php

http://www.cornwall-opc-database.org/

http://www.westcountrygenealogy.com/cornwall/gwinear/

Matthew Grose opens ‘a fine granite quarry’ at Foxdale

Quick recap

You will recall from a previous post, (The Saga of Matthew Grose, John Taylor and The Isle of Man Mining Company) that during January 1846, Captain Matthew Grose (1788-1849) was dramatically and unfairly dismissed (handcuffs indeed!!) from the Isle of Man (Foxdale) Mining Company.

By July 1846, the Crown Mine Agent, John Taylor had stepped in and deprived the company of their lease to land throughout the island, (apart from their mines at Marown). He gave Captain Matthew Grose setts of land taken from the company.

So what happened next?

A fine granite quarry:

By September 1846, the Manx Liberal newspaper reported on an exciting new venture by the entrepreneurial Captain Grose, his sons and Richard Powning (his son-in-law):

“We are gratified to learn that in consequence of the recent eruptions at the Foxdale mines, our Island is likely to he benefitted to a considerable extent. A fine granite quarry has just been opened in the neighbourhood of the mines by Messrs. Grose and Powning, and we learn that orders have been received for large shipments of the stones to Birkenhead, to be used in the construction of the docks now building there.”

Manx Liberal, Saturday, September 12, 1846; Page: 3, Courtesy of Manx National Heritage

The first shipment:

By January 1847, the Manx Sun newspaper reports on the first shipment of Foxdale granite leaving the island for Birkenhead. There is also interest from London for paving blocks.

“The first shipment of excellent granite, raised at Foxdale, took place this week at Peel, for Birkenhead. Some of the blocks weighed five tons, and are intended for the construction of Birkenhead docks. We likewise have heard that a party in London are in treaty with the workers of this quarry for smaller blocks, suitable for paving. The stone is reported to be of excellent quality.”

Manx Sun, Saturday, January 16, 1847; Page: 4, Courtesy of Manx National Heritage

Paving Douglas:

In January 1847, it is reported that Douglas is to be paved with Foxdale granite…

“We understand that the High Bailiff of this town [Douglas] intends to order -from the proprietors of the granite quarry, at Foxdale, stone to pave the market-place. If found to answer, of which there can be no doubt, the streets are to be all paved with the recently-explored Foxdale granite, of which there is an inexhaustible supply. It is said to surpass the Scotch granite, the only place where that stone is to be had in Great Britain.”

 

Manx Liberal, Saturday, January 30, 1847; Page: 3, Courtesy of Manx National Heritage

Church at St. John’s:



In May 1847, the Manx Liberal newspaper reported on the enormous quantities of granite being shipped and how the new church at St Johns’s will be built of Foxdale granite:

The granite quarry at Foxdale, is likely to become of great benefit to this Island. Tbe number of men has been increased of late, and carts from the different parishes in the Island are employed in conveying the blocks of stone to Douglas daily, from whence it is exported to London; one day this week the dray of Mr. John Hogg, of this town, brought down three tons, in company with a train of other carts. Several of the hands who worked at the Scotch quarries are employed here, and by them the stone is acknowledged to be of a superior quality, and is of easier transition for exportation than in Scotland. The new church at St. John’s, it is said, will be built of this stone.

Manx Liberal, Saturday, May 22, 1847; Page: 3, Courtesy of Manx National Heritage


Image of Tynwald Church, St John’s © (Posted with permission of image owner: Rob Cannell, Isle of Man)

Stone for sale:

In May 1848, we see Matthew Grose, Richard Powning (his son-in-law) and a business associate, Charles Berry, selling off granite stone:


Manx Sun, Wednesday, May 17, 1848, Courtesy of Manx National Heritage

(If anyone knows what this ‘Coroner’s Sale’ might imply, please let me know!)

Death:

In 1849, Captain Matthew Grose passes away on 19th June, 1849 and buried on 23rd June at St. Ruinus, Marown.

“On Thursday last at Laburnum Cottage, near this town. Capt Matthew Grose, for many years manager of the Foxdale Mines, aged 70 years.”

Manx Sun, Wednesday, June 27, 1849; Page: 5, Courtesy of Manx National Heritage

The Albert Tower:

Just a month after Captain Grose’s death, the Manx Liberal newspaper reports on the opening of the Albert Tower in Ramsey and how Foxdale granite was used for the window corners:

The Tower was built by subscription by the inhabitants of Ramsey, from the design of G. W Buck, Esq.; it is a square building, about forty feet high, built of blue slate, with the exception of the window corners and coping, which are built of granite from the Foxdale quarries. The door is on the eastern side, over which are the three legs of man, and the following inscription :

—”Albert Tower. Erected on the spot where H.R.H. Prince Albert stood to view Ramsey and its neighbourhood, during the visit of Her Most Gracious Majesty Queen Victoria to Ramsey Bay, the XXth September, MDCCCXLVII.”

Manx Liberal, Saturday, July 28, 1849; Page: 3, Courtesy of Manx National Heritage
img_4243
Image of Albert Tower, Ramsey, Isle of Man © (Image owner: Adventurous Ancestors)

A tribute:

Perhaps it is a fitting tribute to the adventurous ancestor, Captain Matthew Grose. He was baptised in the tiny hilltop village of Loxton, Somerset in 1788 whilst his Cornish father and uncle were there on a speculative copper mining venture.
After his own mining adventures (in Cornwall, Somerset and the Isle of Man), he ends by contributing materials to build Birkenhead docks, pave the streets of Douglas and London, build a church at St John’s and finally decorate the Albert Tower – which is built on a hilltop, celebrating the visit of Royalty.

Further reading:

Quarries
Albert Tower
Church at St John’s

The migration of Matthew Grose (1788 – 1849)

Leaving the south west and heading north.

Matthew Grose, born in 1788, is the Adventurous Ancestor who left the mines of Cornwall and Somerset in England.

Around 1828 he was seeking new opportunities in the mines of Foxdale in the Isle of Man.

Moving with his wife, children, other family members, friends and mining / engineering colleagues from Cornwall  – they all headed across the breezy Irish Sea.

Upon arrival in the Isle of Man, his community-minded wife, Mrs Mary Grose (nee Wearn), would have noticed the hustle and bustle in the town of Douglas.

“Women often with round hats, like the Welsh, and girls without shoes and stockings, though otherwise not ill dressed..”

 

 (Extract from a visitor’s diary in 1828)

Bringing mining expertise to the island

Matthew Grose came from a renowned family of mining captains and engineers. Like other Cornishmen migrating to the Isle of Man, he brought with him specialised skills and direct experience of new technologies that were revolutionising mining at that time.

Previously we’ve read about his father, Matthew Grose (1760 – 1824) and uncle, Samuel Grose senior  (1764 – 1825) who were mining captains in Cornwall and Somerset.

Captain Matthew Grose (1788 – 1849) was a first cousin to Captain Samuel Grose junior (1791 – 1866), who was a pupil of Richard Trevithick. Samuel Grose junior was called the ‘most scientific engineer in Cornwall’.


Many of Matthew Grose’s sons became mine captains, agents and engineers. His sisters and daughters married into families of other Cornish mine captains and engineers.

Timeline for Matthew Grose (1788 – 1849)

1788 Matthew Grose is baptised at the parish church of St Andrew, Loxton, Somerset. His father, Matthew Grose and uncle, Samuel Grose are likely in Loxton with other Cornish miners on an expedition to explore the green veins that have been found in the caves there. Unfortunately these contain no copper and the venture is abandoned.

1789 (likely earlier) – 1800 His father, Matthew and uncle, Samuel are mine captains at the Dodington copper mines.

  • 1793? His brother John baptised in ? 
  • 1797? His sister, Elizabeth baptised in Somerset? (Wife of Obadiah Ash?).

1801 Dodington copper mine in Somerset closes when unable to raise capital to buy a steam pumping engine.

  • 1801 His brother William and sister Grace are baptised in Gwinear.
  • 1807 His sister Elizabeth (Eliza) is baptised in Gwinear
  • 1809 His sister, Mary, marries Henry Francis in Gwinear.

1809 Aged 21, he marries Mary Vivian Wearn in Phillack.

1810 His uncle, Samuel Grose snr and cousin, Samuel Grose jnr, puts their names to a ‘protest of miners’ at Wheal Alfred in the Royal Cornwall Gazette. They are distancing themselves from political reformist, Edward Budd who was establishing a new newspaper (the West Briton or Miners Journal). A ‘Matthew Grose’ signs the petition too – likely him (or father).

  • 1812 His daughter, Emma is baptised in Phillack.
  • 1814 His daughter Jane is baptised in Phillack. On one census she describes herself as from Relubbus. Perhaps her father worked at mines near there.
  • 1817 His daughter Mary is baptised in Phillack

1817 Dodington Copper mines in Somerset reopen when a steam pumping engine is installed.

  • 1819 His son, Matthew is baptised in Phillack.
  • 1821 His son, Thomas is baptised in Dodington, Somerset

1821 Dodington mines in Somerset close after heavy losses.

1824 His father, Matthew Grose, is buried in Dodington, Somerset

  • 1826 His son John is born in England. (No baptism record found yet). John is husband of Charlotte Clucas.
  • 1826 His daughter Mary is baptised in Phillack.

1828 Isle of Man mining company formed by investors from Liverpool, Chester and Flintshire and lease Foxdale mines.

  • 1831 His daughter Eliza Grace is baptised in Marown, Isle of Man
  • 1832 His son Edwin William Wearn Grose is baptised in Marown, Isle of Man
  • 1833 His daughter Lavinia is baptised in Marown, Isle of Man
  • 1835 His eldest daughter, Emma, marries Captain Jonathan Harrison (both ‘of Foxdale Mines’) at Kirk Patrick, Isle of Man. The couple move to Llanidloes in Wales, then onto Meadowtown, Westcott and Snailbeach mines in Shropshire.
  • 1835 His son, Samuel Grose is baptised in Marown, Isle of Man
  • 1837 His sister, Eliza, marries Captain Absalom Francis in Shrewsbury, Shropshire and then to the mines of Halkyn, Flintshire.

1839 His wife Mary Wearn passes away at Foxdale Mines, Isle of Man. Her obituary in the West Briton newspaper, Jan 25, 1839 reads 

“On Tuesday, the 8th instant, at Foxdale Mines, Isle of Man, Mary, the beloved wife of Captain Matthew Grose, aged 49 years, deeply regretted by all her family and friends. Her charities and benevolence had endeared her to all classes, and in her the poor of the surrounding district have lost a kind benefactor and adviser.



Manks Advertiser, Tuesday, January 08, 1839; Page: 3, Courtesy of Manx National Heritage

1839 Aged 51, He marries his second wife, Mary Tregonning in Holywell, Flintshire

  • 1840 His daughter, Jane, marries Richard Powning in Marown, Isle of Man. The witness to their marriage is Foxdale Mine Captain Edward Bawden.

1841 He appears on the 1841 census at Foxdale Mines, Isle of Man as a Mine Agent along with his children Matthew (miner), Thomas (engineer), John (engineer), Mary, Eliza, Edward, Lavinia and Samuel.

1844 Examines lead ore in Castletown


Manx Sun, Saturday, May 04, 1844; Page: 4, Courtesy of Manx National Heritage

  • 1841 His son, Captain Matthew Grose, marries Anne Weston Read in Kirk German, Isle of Man.

1841 His mother, Jane/Jennifer passes away in Goldsithney, Perranuthnoe, Cornwall. Her obituary in the West Briton newspaper reads

 

“At Goldsithney, in Perranuthnoe, on the 23rd instant, at the house of her son, Capt. John Grose, Mrs. Jane Grose, aged 80 years, relict of the late Capt. Matthew Grose, formerly of Gwinear, and of Dodington in Somerset, much regretted and respected by her numerous family and friends. Her end was peace.”

 

1846

Dramatically dismissed (see separate blog post) from the Isle of Man Mining Company


Manx Sun, Saturday, January 10, 1846; Page: 8, Courtesy of Manx National Heritage

1846

Opens stone quarry to send granite to Birkenhead for building docks.

1849 

Matthew Grose passes away.


Manx Sun, Wednesday, June 27, 1849; Page: 5

He is buried at Marown, Isle of Man


Resources and further reading:

http://www.manxmines.com/manx__mines__history.htm

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/domesday/dblock/GB-226000-476000/page/10

http://www.nmrs.org.uk/assets/pdf/BM3/BM3-34-42-introduction.pdf

https://www.gov.im/lib/docs/mnh/education/trb/mining/teachersresourcebkpt2thestoryofmi.pdf

http://www.cornish-mining.org.uk/delving-deeper/cornish-mining-isle-man

Please contact if you spot any errors, or have additional information to improve this post!

Mining Captains, Matthew Grose and Samuel Grose

Researching the Grose family history in the Isle of Man leads us over to Cornwall where Mining Captain Matthew Grose (1819 – 1887) was born.

His parents were Matthew Grose and Mary Vivian Wearn who married in Phillack, Cornwall on 6th June, 1809.

He was baptised in Phillack, Cornwall on 19th March, 1819 and buried in Arbory, Isle of Man on 14th October, 1887.

Some questions included…

Who was his father, (also called Captain Matthew Grose), born c1788 and buried in Marown, Isle of Man on 23rd June, 1849? It had always been a struggle to find a baptism record for him.

Was there any family connection to Captain Samuel Grose (1791 – 1866), ‘the most scientific engineer in Cornwall’?

The breakthrough came from two baptism records written side-by-side from the parish church of  St Andrew in LOXTON, Somerset!


Researching Matthew and Samuel Grose

In the 1700s and 1800s, the names ‘Matthew Grose’ and ‘Samuel Grose’ appear many times. There were confusing connections between Redruth, Hayle, Phillack and Gwinear in Cornwall, Somerset, Halkyn in Flintshire and the Isle of Man.

Time to attempt to work out ‘who was who’ and ‘what was what’.

Let’s start with two other mining captains, also called Matthew and Samuel Grose – two brothers baptised at St Uny in Redruth in the 1760s. (They had other interesting siblings – to be discussed another time).

These two brothers, Matthew and Samuel Grose worked as mine captains at Dodington in Somerset.

Their parents were likely Matthew Grose (1732- ) and Mary Davey.


CAPTAIN MATTHEW GROSE (1761-1824)

Matthew Grose was baptised at St Uny, Redruth on 24th May, 1761.

He married Jane/Jennifer Williams on 21st April, 1783 at St Uny, Redruth.

Matthew and Jane/Jennifer Grose’s children:

  • Mary baptised in St Uny, Redruth, Cornwall, 11th April 1784
  • Mary baptised in St Uny, Redruth, Cornwall, 14th May 1786
  • Matthew baptised at St Andrew’s Church in Loxton Somerset in 1788. This is who married Mary Vivian Wearn in 1809. They migrated to the Isle of Man in the 1820s where he was a Mine Captain at Foxdale and Ballacorkish (Rushen) mines. He married his second wife, Mary Tregonning, in Flintshire in 1839. (His son was Captain Matthew Grose (1819 – 1887) who took over at Ballacorkish mines & also captain at others).
  • John baptised in ? in 1793?
  • Elizabeth baptised in Somerset in 1797? Wife of Obadiah Ash.
  • William baptised in Gwinear, Cornwall, 27th December, 1801
  • Grace baptised in Gwinear, Cornwall, 27th December 1801
  • Elizabeth (Eliza) baptised in Gwinear, Cornwall, 15th March 1807. Likely the second wife of Absalom Francis, married in Shropshire, 1837 and lived in Halkyn, Flintshire.

This Matthew Grose, born 1760, was buried in Dodington, Somerset in 1824.

CAPTAIN SAMUEL GROSE (1764 – 1825)

Samuel Grose was baptised at St Uny, Redruth, 26th December 1764.

He married Eleanor Giddy at St Uny, Redruth on 21st June 1786

Samuel and Eleanor Grose’s children

  • Eleanor baptised in Holford, Somerset, 24th December 1786 (born 12th October, 1786)
  • Mary baptised in St. Andrew’s Church in Loxton, Somerset in 1788
  • Mary baptised in Luxborough, Somerset in 1789 (TBC)
  • Samuel baptised in Somerset, 1791. He married Ann Vivian in 1812. He was a pupil of Richard Trevithick and designer of the Cornish Engine. ‘The oldest and most scientific engineer in Cornwall.
  • Matthew baptised at All Saints church in Dodington, Somerset, 11th December 1795. Unmarried, copper  miner/Mine Agent on censuses of 1841 and 1851 in Gwinear.
  • Edward Giddy baptised in Nether Stowey, Holford, Somerset, 22nd November 1799 (&/or 28th Nov 1799 in Taunton, Somerset).
  • Elizabeth Giddy baptised in Gwinear, 6th January 1805.
  • James baptised in Gwinear, Cornwall, 25th February 1810. Wesleyan Methodist Minister.

This Samuel Grose, born 1764, was buried in Gwinear in Cornwall in 1825.


Mining Captains on the move!

The baptism locations of their children all have links to the mining and engineering activities of the Grose family in Cornwall and Somerset.
Redruth, Cornwall

Boomed from the 1730s for tin and copper mining when steam engines were used to pump water out of deeper mines. Town grew rapidly in the late 18th century.

Loxton, Somerset

Loxton Cavern was written about in ‘The Gentleman’s Magazine’ in 1794.

Cornish miners came to the caves in the 1790’s where green veins’ were tested for copper. Upon assay they contained no copper and the venture was abandoned. The Cornish miners removed stalactites, possibly for sale or souvenirs.

Dodington, Nether Stowey and Luxborough, Somerset

The Dodington estate was inherited by the Marquis of Buckingham in 1762.

William Jenkin (a close associate of the Grose family) was the mine agent for the Marquis’s Cornish mines and developed mining on the Dodington estate.

Copper was mined sporadically from the 1780s until 1801, but the mine closed when unable to raise capital to buy a steam pumping engine.

Tom Poole’s business acumen and ‘the practical enthusiasm of Matthew Grose‘ the mine captain, lead to a steam pumping engine being installed and mining began again from 1817 until ceasing in 1821 after heavy losses.
Gwinear, Cornwall

Gwinear lies two miles east of Hayle and there were many mines and engineering works in the area.

Samuel Grose (1791-1866) designed the Cornish engine and some were built by Sandys Vivian and co. at the Copperhouse Foundry in Hayle.

Making Connections

Descending from the two brothers from Redruth, Cornwall who went copper mining in Somerset – we can see that Captain Matthew Grose (1788 – 1849) who migrated to the Isle of Man was the first cousin of Captain Samuel Grose (1791 – 1866), ‘the oldest and most scientific engineer in Cornwall.’


Sources and further reading:

Most records from searches on Ancestry, FamilySearch and Find My Past

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Mining-Quantocks-John-Frederick-Lawrence/dp/0900187190

http://www.friendsofcoleridge.com/MembersOnly/Dunning.html

http://www.cornish-mining.org.uk/delving-deeper/mining-somerset

http://archaeologydataservice.ac.uk/archiveDS/archiveDownload?t=arch-1416-1/dissemination/pdf/9781848021648_Quantocks_all.pdf

http://www.iomfhs.im/resources/lawsons/v2/spouses.pdf

http://petergardner.info/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/Samuel-Grose-1793-1866.pdf

https://navsbooks.wordpress.com/2017/01/30/samuel-grose/

 

Note: Any errors or omissions in this post are unintentional and might be my mistakes, or transcription errors. Happy to review and update as additional information discovered and shared. Please contact if you can help.