The career of Captain Matthew Grose (1819 – 1887)

Born in Cornwall, Captain Matthew Grose (1819-1887) was a renowned Mining Engineer in the Isle of Man. He managed Ballacorkish Mines on the island and also inspected many others, too numerous to cover in one post.

He was a mining man through and through. His father, also called Matthew Grose (1788 – 1849), born in Loxton, Somerset, was a Mine Agent who worked in Cornwall, then at Foxdale Mines, Isle of Man from 1828-1846, before opening a ‘fine granite quarry’.

His grandfather, another Matthew Grose (1761 – 1824) and great uncle, Samuel Grose (1764 – 1825) were Cornish Mine Captains born in Redruth, who worked at mines in Cornwall and Somerset.

More information about his family can be found here.


Photo of Matthew Grose 1819-1887 (Courtesy of Manx National Heritage)

1819 Matthew was baptised at Phillack, Cornwall on 19th March, 1819.

1828: At the age of nine, Matthew moved to the Isle of Man where his father becomes a Mine Agent at Foxdale Mines.

1841: The census shows Matthew is living and working at Foxdale Mines with his father who is the Mine Agent there. Matthew is working as a miner and his brothers, Thomas and John are engineers. Later that year he married Anne Weston Read.

1846: Slater’s Directory (Douglas) lists Captain Mathew Grose as the Agent to the Foxdale Mining Co. Adress given as Moore’s court, Market place. This is his father, but undoubtably both were still working closely. This is the year his father was dramatically dismissed from Foxdale Mines. The Crown Agent, John Taylor, then stepped in and gave him setts of land & he opened a fine granite quarry.

1846-1851: At some point adventuring, exploration and lead mining begins at Ballacorkish (Rushen Mines) on the hillside above Colby.

1851: The census shows Matthew Grose residing at Ballagawne in Rushen with wife, Annie, four of his children and a house servant. His occupation is given as Agent of Mines.

 1852: The Brig Lily is shipwrecked on the islet of Kitterland. The following morning a salvage team go to save the cargo, but the gunpowder aboard explodes. Miners at Ballacorkish have their candles go out and are thrown over by the force of the explosion.


Manx Sun, Saturday, January 01, 1853; Page: 12

1855: Limited lead mining operations are still ongoing at Ballacorkish.

ballacorkish 1855

Mona’s Herald, Wednesday, April 11, 1855; Page: 7

1856: Captain Matthew Grose supervises all mines in the parish of Rushen

Manx Sun, Saturday, February 23, 1856; Page: 4, Courtesy of Manx National Heritage

1857: Matthew Grose inspects Peel Castle Mines



Manx Sun, Saturday, December 19, 1857; Page: 23

1861: The census shows Matthew Grose residing at Ballacorkish in Rushen with wife, Annie, eight of his children and a house servant. His occupation is given as Lead and Copper Mine Agent.

1862: In April, newspapers report on The South Foxdale Silver Lead Mining Company offering shares to purchase

“the lease of an extensive sett of richly mineralised property…”

And

“The sett having recently been surveyed by eminent mining engineers — Captain R. Rowe of the Laxey; Captain M. Grose, Isle of Man, whose report is endorsed…”

Mona’s Herald, Wednesday, April 16, 1862; Page: 4


Manx Sun, Saturday, April 19, 1862; Page: 12

The Manx Mines website states:

Work resumed when the mines were reopened in 1862 and developed on two lodes. Two shafts had been sunk 600 yards apart and the sett was worked as two separate mines which were known simply as North and South with no connections being made underground. The North, or Phosphate shaft (Rushen mine) was sunk to a depth of 360 feet (60 fathoms) with levels at 15, 30, 45 and 60 fathoms. The bottom levels were driven for 180 feet south and 780 feet north. The South shaft  (Ballacorkish) was sunk to a depth of 450 feet (75 fathoms) with levels driven at 12, 24, 36, 60 and the bottom at 75 fathoms which had been driven to a length of 390 feet south and 1470 feet north. Both mines had to pump water out at the rate of about thirty gallons per minute but an adit level driven from the main road also helped to drain the mine and reduce the pumping cost.

Extract from: http://www.manxmines.com/BALLACORKISH.htm

1863: Thwaites Directory (Rushen) lists Captain Matthew Grose as the manager of South Foxdale Mines (Ballacorkish).

The South Foxdale Silver-Lead Mining Company have recently been established for the working of a set of mines lying south of the Foxdale mines. The set includes the Ballacorkish Mine and is upwards of four miles in extent. The capital of the company is £25,000 raised in shares of £6 each. The works comprise an edit level driven about 300 fathoms, which has yielded a considerable quantity of lead ore and blonde. About 200 fathoms from the entrance is a large east and west lode, from which, within a very small space, a cargo of rich silver ore was raised. About 80 fathoms in advance of this edit, two shafts have been sunk about 20 fathoms deep, and several parcels of ore raised; and a few fathoms from the present end of edit, several lumps of ore near the surface have been found in an east and west direction, yielding from 60 to 60 ounces of silver to the ton of ore.

Also, 

“Captain Grose… has for years past entertained a high opinion of the property”


Mona’s Herald, Wednesday, July 01, 1863; Page: 2, Courtesy of Manx National Heritage

1863: Matthew is involved with other mining operations on the island.

LEAD MINE AT KERROW – MOAR , LEZAYRE .— Some two years ago a company commenced operations in search of the metal in this district, and after bestowing considerable labour and expense , were so ill remunerated for their outlay and trouble that the project was by them abandoned. Not discouraged, however, by a past failure , a new company has been formed, and a number of miners and labourers are now engaged in sinking a shaft and making other necessary preparations for searching for hidden treasures. The new company have not taken to the old working, but opened a new one a little higher up the hill, though in the immediate neighbourhood of the old mine. We bave been informed, on reliable authority, that they have already, during their progress, obtained large Quantities of ore, with encouraging prospects before them. Under the mining skill of Captain Grose, there is no doubt that the resources of this new mine will be fully developed; and if successful ia the enterprise, it will prove a great boon to the labouring classes of this locality.”

Mona’s Herald, Wednesday, December 16, 1863; Page: 3

1868: Mining operations are going well at Ballacorkish.


Isle of Man Times, Saturday, May 09, 1868; Page: 6

His wife Anne died in May 1868.

He takes out a notice in the newspaper to state that he won’t be responsible for debts contracted by others.


Isle of Man Times, Saturday, June 13, 1868; Page: 8

In September 1868 he marries his second wife, a widow, Elizabeth Luff (nee Qualtrough).

In October 1868, two of his sons are in bother for stealing apples. Matthew Grose is referred to as:

“…the well-known manager of the Ballacorkish Mines, who is respected and beloved by all who know him.”

Mona’s Herald, Wednesday, October 14, 1868; Page: 3 (Courtesy of Manx National Heritage)

1870: Matthew issues several reports on progress at Ballacorkish.


Isle of Man Times, Saturday, January 29, 1870; Page: 3


Isle of Man Times, Saturday, February 12, 1870; Page: 3


Isle of Man Times, Saturday, April 09, 1870; Page: 3


Isle of Man Times, Saturday, April 23, 1870; Page: 3


Image of Ballacorkish Mines © (Posted with permission of image owner: Rob Cannell, Isle of Man)

1870 proves a dramatic year at Ballacorkish. Very shortly after the mining updates it appears in the newspapers that…

“some fresh arrangements have taken place”

and

“Major Thorpe who holds a large number of shares in the mines has taken the sole management of this important undertaking”

and

“Some slight difficulties arose in the fresh management of the affairs.”

The ‘slight difficulties’ being that Major Thorpe made allegations that five young men (including some relatives of Captain Grose) had threatened to “Cook his Goose” and shoot him!



Manx Sun, Saturday, May 14, 1870; Section: Front page, Page: 1

But was it fake news?

Isle of Man Times, Saturday, June 18, 1870; Page: 3

1871: The England census shows Matthew Grose (Mine Agent) with his second wife Elizabeth (nee Qualtrough). He is in Pontesbury, Shropshire, England visiting his older sister Emma Harrison (nee Grose) who is wife of Jonathan Harrison (Mine Agent).

He is also on the 1871 Isle of Man census at Ballakilpatrick road, Rushen with occupation given as Agent Lead Mines.

1872: Matthew Grose inspects a mine at Dalby, Isle of Man.


13 April 1872 – Isle of Man Times – Douglas, Isle of Man

1873: Newspapers report on the issuing of a prospectus for the Colby Mining Company limited

 “for working silver lead mining properties in the Isle of Man, covering nearly 400 acres in the parish of Arboury. Capt. Rowe, of the Great Laxey Mines; Capt. Bowden formerly of the Foxdale Mine; and Capt. Grose formerly of the Ballacorkish Mine all report very favourably of the prospects of the mine.”


1875: Matthew Grose is appointed manager again. 

“…a more competent gentleman can scarcely be found.”

 


Isle of Man Times, 13 March, 1875

1880: Matthew seems to be in some financial difficulties with his goods and effects being sold off.


Mona’s Herald, Wednesday, April 28, 1880; Page: 8

1881: The census shows him at The Level, Rushen with wife and children. He is Captain of Lead Mines, unemployed.

1886: Matthew Grose is ill and residing at Ballakillowey.


Isle of Man Examiner, Saturday, March 13, 1886; Page: 4

1887: Matthew passes away at Ballavayre (or Beal-e-Vere in the newspaper).

Manx Sun, Saturday, October 22, 1887; Page: 13, Courtesy of Manx National Heritage

Conclusion:

These are just a handful of the references to Matthew Grose’s long mining career on the Isle of Man. In future posts, specific aspects might be revisited and discussed in more detail.

Thanks’, Resources and Further Reading:

Many thanks to iMuseum Newspapers & Publications  for providing digital access to the Isle of Man newspapers (from 1792 to 1960). Images and text are shared on this blog in accordance with their policy of using & sharing for ‘non-commercial personal use’.

Also thanks to fellow researcher, Rob Cannell – between us we’ve found plenty of newspaper clippings!

http://www.manxmines.com/BALLACORKISH.htm

https://www.aditnow.co.uk/mines/Ballacorkish-Lead-Mine-2/

https://www.aditnow.co.uk/Album/Photographs-Of-Ballacorkish_62848/

http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/record?catid=5641891&catln=6

http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/C4800471

‘GROSE’ Burials at Gwinear, Cornwall

In previous posts, (parts 1, 2 & 3), we’ve looked at ‘GROSE’ graves & memorials at the Parish Church of Saint Gwinear in Cornwall.

How do these compare with all ‘GROSE’ burials recorded in Gwinear, listed on the Cornwall OPC Database? Is anyone else related to Matthew Grose (1788-1849) who migrated to the Isle of Man?

(Screenshot from Cornwall OPC Database: accessed 15th March, 2017)

Who’s who?

Working down the list in date order…

  • William Grose and Grace Grose are siblings both buried in 1818. Their grave is posted about here. They are the younger siblings of John Grose ‘the Perranuthnoe grocer’ and Matthew Grose ‘who migrated to Foxdale, Isle of Man’.
  • Samuel Grose buried 1825 and Eleanor Grose (nee Giddy) buried 1850, are the parents of ‘the famous engineer’ Samuel Grose. No photo of their grave yet. Can you help?
  • Matthew Grose buried 1853 is the younger brother of ‘the famous engineer’ Samuel Grose. No photo of Matthew’s grave yet. Can you help?
  • Jane Grose (nee Jennings) buried 1856 is the wife of John Grose ‘the Perranuthnoe grocer’ (younger brother of Matthew Grose ‘who migrated to Foxdale, Isle of Man’). Her grave is posted about here.
  • Samuel Grose (buried 1866) is ‘the famous engineer’and Nanny Grose (buried 1867), is Ann (nee Vivian), his wife. Their grave is posted about here.
  • Thomas Grose, buried 1885, not yet researched. Can you help?
  • Ruth Grose, buried 1890, not yet researched. Can you help?

Conclusion:

From the ten individuals buried in Gwinear, graves for half of them have been located, photographed, identified and discussed.

Eight of the individuals listed, (plus others, not buried, but on memorials) are related to our adventurous ancestor, Matthew Grose (1788-1849) who migrated to Foxdale, Isle of Man.

The final two, Ruth and Thomas Grose, might be related too, but they’re to be researched another day!

Next stop, back to the Isle of Man!!

Graves at St Gwinear: part 3: Samuel Grose junior (1791-1866)

The Grave of ‘the Most Scientific Engineer in Cornwall’!

At the Parish Church of Saint Gwinear in Cornwall, we have a very special grave to see.

The Grave:

Image of grave at St Gwinear Church, Cornwall © (Posted with permission of image owner: Fiona)

Transcription provided with photo:

SACRED
 
TO THE MEMORY OF
 
SAMUEL GROSE
 
OF THIS PARISH
 
WHO DIED 12th JUNE 1866
 
AGED 75 years.

ALSO ANN
 
HIS BELOVED WIFE
 
WHO DIED 15th MARCH 1867
 
AGED 77 years.


Sown in corruption raised in glory

What’s so interesting about these pair?

Samuel Grose junior (1791-1866) was called ‘the most scientific engineer in Cornwall’. He was a pupil of Richard Trevithick and employed around 1812 at Wheal Prosper to erect a high pressure engine. From his obituary we also discover…

He was engineer to some of the principal mines in Cornwall up to the time of his death.
In 1825 Mr. S. Grose first introduced clothing the cylinders, nozzles, steam pipes, &c., in an engine at Wheal Hope mine, and in 1827 he carried out his plans in an 80in. engine at Wheal Lowan mine; he also increased the pressure of steam there, obtaining from this engine a duty of 60,000,000. His engines were always characterised by a strict attention to detail, which displayed a keen discernment on the part of the designer.
We had the pleasure of his acquaintance, and much admired his kind disposition and unpretending manners. He lived not to astonish the world with very brilliant discoveries, but he “Did good by stealth and blushed to find it fame”, and left the world bequeathing to engineering science his improvements in the Cornish engine, which rank first in importance since the time of Trevithick and Wolf.

via Samuel Grose – Graces Guide

Family Connections:

Samuel junior was the son of Samuel Grose senior (1764-1825) who managed Dodington Copper Mines in Somerset and held positions at mines in Cornwall, including Wheal Alfred.

This makes him the nephew of Matthew Grose (1761-1824) who was a Mine Agent at Dodington Mines. Matthew’s memorial, also at Gwinear, is covered in this post.

Samuel Grose junior is the first cousin of John Grose (1793-1842), the grocer and draper from Goldsithney, Perranuthnoe, Cornwall who also has a memorial at Gwinear. On the photo (above), it can be seen in the background.

Likewise, Samuel Grose junior is the first cousin of Matthew Grose (1788-1849) who migrated to Foxdale, Isle of Man. This cousin was a Mine Agent at the Foxdale Mines from 1828-1846, before opening a ‘fine granite quarry’ near Foxdale.

Samuel Grose’s Will:

The details and date on his Will, match perfectly with those on the grave.

England & Wales, National Probate Calendar (Index of Wills and Administrations),1861-1941 Ancestry.com Online publication – Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. Original data – Principal Probate Registry. Calendar of the Grants of Probate and Letters of Administration made in the Probate Registries of the High Court of Justice in England. London

From the Cornwall OPC database we find Samuel’s burial at Gwinear:

Day Month 16-Jun
Year 1866
Parish Or Reg District Gwinear
Forename Samuel
Surname GROSE
Age 75
Residence Wall

Although it is well documented Samuel was born at Dodington or Nether Stowey in Somerset, whilst his father worked there, we don’t have a baptism record, yet.

Samuel’s wife, Ann Grose:

Anne [Ann, Nanny] Grose (nee Vivian) was the daughter of John Vivian and Mary Carne. No definite baptism record yet. From the census records she was born in London around 1791.

(There is a baptism record in Gwinear for Anna Vivian, baptised 16th Feb, 1796, daughter of John and Mary which may be worthy of further investigation).

From the Cornwall OPC Database, Samuel Grose “the younger” and Anne Vivian married 23rd July, 1812 at Gwinear. His rank/profession is given as ‘gentleman’ on the marriage record. The witnesses are John Vivian, (likely her father) and John Vivian junior, (likely her brother).

On the Cornwall OPC database,  see a burial for a ‘Nanny Grose’ in Gwinear that fits.

Day Month 20-Mar
Year 1867
Parish Or Reg District Gwinear
Forename Nanny
Surname GROSE
Age 77
Residence Wall

Also a match from the England & Wales, Civil Registration Death Index, 1837-1915

Name: Nanny Grose
Estimated birth year: abt 1790
Registration Year: 1867
Registration Quarter: Jan-Feb-Mar
Age at Death: 77
Registration district: Redruth


FreeBMD. England & Wales, Civil Registration Death Index, 1837-1915 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006.

Conclusion:

An ordinary looking grave for an extraordinary engineer and his wife!

From exploring the associated records we get confirmation that this is their grave. Both Samuel Grose junior and his wife Ann[e] were buried here at the Parish Church of St Gwinear, Cornwall.

In the next post, we’ll have a quick look at which other family graves or memorials we should expect to find here at Gwinear, Cornwall.

(Then back over to the Isle of Man!)

Graves at St Gwinear: part 2: John Grose (1793 – 1842)

Another Grave!

Still at the Parish Church of Saint Gwinear in Cornwall, we have another interesting grave/memorial to look at.

John Grose:

This time it’s John Grose (the younger brother of Matthew Grose (1788-1849) who migrated to the Isle of Man).

Image of grave at St Gwinear Church, Cornwall © (Posted with permission of image owner: Fiona)

Transcription provided with photo:

SACRED

TO

THE MEMORY OF

JOHN GROSE

Who departed this life on the

16th day of May

1842

Aged 49 years.

Also of

JANE GROSE

Wife of the above

Who departed this life on the

30th day of October

1856

Aged 50 years.

In love they lived, in peace they died

Their lives was craved but God denied.

ALSO OF

EDWARD JENNINGS

Who died June 23rd 1878

Aged 54 years

He died trusting in his saviour.

What do we know about John Grose?

John Grose is the son of Captain Matthew Grose (1761-1824) whose Memorial is also at Gwinear and details covered in this other post.

According to the 1841 census (below) and also his 1842 Will, John Grose was a grocer and draper in Goldsithney, Perranuthnoe, Cornwall.

(Source: Class: HO107; Piece: 143; Book: 11; Civil Parish: Perran Ulthnoe; County: Cornwall; Enumeration District: 6; Folio: 27; Page: 22; Line: 15; GSU roll: 241265 (Census Returns of England and Wales, 1841; Ancestry.com Operations, Inc; 2010; Provo, UT, USA))

We don’t have a baptism record for John Grose yet, but from his grave we can estimate his birth around 1793.

This fits with the Cornwall Memorial Inscription record on FindMyPast.

First name(s) JOHN
Last name GROSE
Age 49
Birth year 1793
Death year 1842
Death date May 1842
Place GWINEAR

 

Also the England & Wales Deaths 1837-2007 record on FindMyPast

Death quarter 2
Death year 1842
District Penzance
County Cornwall
Volume 9
Page 152

 

Although we have this Memorial Inscription and death record, we don’t yet have a burial record in Gwinear. Is this headstone indicating a burial place, or memorial for John Grose?

Captain?

Another question: He is titled as Captain John Grose on his mother’s obituary.

“At Goldsithney, in Perranuthnoe, on the 23rd instant, at the house of her son, Capt. John Grose, Mrs. Jane Grose, aged 80 years, relict of the late Capt. Matthew Grose, formerly of Gwinear, and of Dodington in Somerset, much regretted and respected by her numerous family and friends. Her end was peace.”

Was he a retired ‘Mine Captain’, or another type of ‘Captain’?

His Will

His Will (transcription ongoing) looks like a an excellent resource of information as mentions some provision for his four living siblings:

“Mary, wife of Mine Agent, Henry Francis”…

“Elizabeth wife of Mine Agent, Obadiah Ash”…

“Eliza, wife of Mine Agent, Absalom Francis.” …

“the children of my brother Captain Matthew Grose as shall be then living.”…



(The National Archives; Kew, England; Prerogative Court of Canterbury and Related Probate Jurisdictions: Will Registers; Class: PROB 11; Piece: 1966)

What do we know about Jane Grose?

According to the marriage record of John Grose and Jane Jennings on 26th January, 1840 from the Cornwall OPC Database, Jane Grose (nee Jennings) is from Gwinear and daughter of Thomas Jennings, a farmer.

With further research on the Cornwall OPC Database, we see Jane’s mother is likely Ann Jennings (nee Hambly). Ann Hambly and Thomas Jennings married in Gwinear in 1802.

We don’t see a baptism in Gwinear for a Jane Jennings, but we have a record for Jennifer Jennings to parents ‘Thomas and Anne Jennings’ which looks like the best match for her.

Day Month 08-Feb
Year 1807
Parish Or Reg District Gwinear
Forename Jennifer
Surname JENNINGS
Sex dau
Father Forename Thomas
Mother Forename Anne

..

From Cornwall OPC database we have a burial record for Jane Grose in 1856 in Gwinear which corresponds with the grave.

What do we know about Edward Jennings?

Edward Jennings is the younger brother of Jane Grose (nee Jennings).

The details of his death match closely with those on the Cornwall OPC Database:

Day Month 27-Jun
Year 1878
Parish Or Reg District Gwinear
Forename Edward
Surname JENNINGS
Age 53
Residence Village

His baptism details from Cornwall OPC Database:

Day Month 27-Jun
Year 1824
Parish Or Reg District Gwinear
Forename Edward
Surname JENNINGS
Sex son
Father Forename Thomas
Mother Forename Ann
Residence Gwinear
Father Rank Profession Farmer


Phew (again)!

So once again a few questions answered & as usual a few more things to find out! Please comment or contact if any errors, or have advice or info.

The next post will look at a third interesting gravestone at St Gwinear, Cornwall. Then we’ll go back over to the Isle of Man!

Useful links:

Cornwall OPC Database

 

Graves at St Gwinear: part 1: Matthew Grose (1761 – 1824)

Thanks Fiona in England & Rob on the Isle of Man. They’ve provided all sorts of extra info & photos. Currently working through & (with their permission) will incorporate into forthcoming posts.

Now… Over to Cornwall!

Quick recap:

Before covering the career of Captain Matthew Grose (1819 – 1887) on the Isle of Man, we’re going for a change of scenery. Back over to Cornwall & Somerset where his grandfather lived & died.

You’ll recall his grandfather was also called Captain Matthew Grose (1761 – 1824) & was the brother of Samuel Grose senior (1764 – 1825). Both baptised in Redruth, Cornwall.

They’re on documents as Mine Captains running Dodington Copper Mines in Somerset for many years. In 1788 we see these two brothers on a mining venture in Loxton, Somerset & both baptising their children there, at the parish church of St. Andrew.

They worked at mines in both Somerset & Cornwall. This other blog post covers their careers & family in more detail.

This Matthew Grose (1761-1824) is the father of Matthew Grose (1788-1849) – who migrated to Foxdale, Isle of Man with his wife & children in 1828.

Graves at St Gwinear:

One of many ‘Wow!’ moments this week was receiving photos of graves, memorials & transcriptions from family history researcher, Fiona. She’s kindly given permission for these to be posted here on the blog.

Each grave will be written about on a separate post, because they all contain key pieces of information.

The Parish Church of Saint Gwinear, Cornwall:

The small village of Gwinear sits on a hill overlooking the Angarrack valley. It’s about three kilometres east of Hayle, Cornwall. There were many mines in the area.

Image of St Gwinear Church, Cornwall © (Posted with permission of image owner: Fiona)

 
At the church there are four main churchyard areas. According to the church website, during 2017, a project is ongoing – to research, record & map ALL burials & memorials there. It’ll be interesting to revisit these records at a later date.

Photograph of Matthew Grose’s Memorial:

Image of Memorial in Gwinear, Cornwall © (Posted with permission of image owner: Fiona)

Transcription provided with photo:

SACRED

To memory of

Captain Matthew Grose

Who died in Doddington in

Sommersetshire the 24th day

Of August 1824 aged 63 years.

And Jane his wife, who died

April 28th 1841 Aged 80 years.

Also William their son who

Died the 1st day of April 1818

Aged 21 years.

And Grace their daughter

Who died February 20th 1818

Aged 19 years.

Firstly, Matthew Grose:

The above transcription shows this as a memorial for Captain Matthew Grose who died in Dodington, Somerset on 24th August 1824 age 63.

The West Somerset Parish Register Transcriptions show his burial record in Dodington as:

Matthew Grose, 11th May, 1824, age 64.

On Findmypast, the Cornwall FHS memorial transcription from Gwinear gives the information as Mathew Grose, 21st August 1821, age 63.

Some slight differences in these records & transcriptions, but nothing too drastic! Confident all refer to same individual.

His wife, Jane Grose:

This transcription gives her information as April 28th 1841, Aged 80 years

This compares closely with her obituary from April 1841:

At Goldsithney, in Perranuthnoe, on the 23rd instant, at the house of her son, Capt. John Grose, Mrs. Jane Grose, aged 80 years, relict of the late Capt. Matthew Grose, formerly of Gwinear, and of Dodington in Somerset, much regretted and respected by her numerous family and friends. Her end was peace.

On Findmypast…

The memorial transcription also gives the information as Jane Grose, age 80, death date 28th April 1841.

Assume this is her death index record (from England & Wales Deaths 1837-2007) because Goldsithney is in the district of Penzance. It shows:

Jane Grose: Death quarter 2, 1841, Penzance, Volume 9, Page 126

William Grose:

The transcription above says died the 1st day of April 1818 Aged 21 years.

On FindMyPast…

Memorial transcription gives 17th April, 1818, Age 21

Burial transcription at Gwinear: 3rd April, 1818, Age 19.

Checking his baptism transcription, we see William Grose baptised in Gwinear on 27th December 1801 to parents Matthew and Jennifer Grose. This is reassuring that the ‘theory’ of Jennifer and Jane being the same person is holding up.

Grace Grose:

This transcription gives February 20th 1818. Aged 19 years.

On FindMyPast…

Memorial transcription: 20th February 1818, Age 19

Burial transcription: 21st February 1818, Age 17

Checking her baptism transcription, we see Grace Grose baptised in Gwinear on 27th December 1801 to parents Matthew and Jennifer Grose. At the same time as her brother, William – again ‘evidence’ that Jennifer and Jane are the same person.

Is Matthew’s wife, Jane or Jennifer Grose?

Apparently Jenny was originally a common ‘nickname’ for Jane. Perhaps that’s why her name varies on records as Jane, Jenefer, Jennifer, Gennifer etc. No marriage record has been found for a Matthew and Jennifer Grose – only Matthew and Jane.

Who’s actually buried here?

  • Their children? Probably. Both age 20-ish, William and Grace, have burial records in 1818 for Gwinear, so are likely buried here. How sad (and strange) that they were baptised at the same time & died within a few months of each other. Coincidence? Illness? An accident?

Their older brother, (our Matthew Grose (1788-1849)), would likely have attended this burial service in 1818. He was still in the Hayle/Phillack area (baptising own children, Mary in 1817 and Matthew in 1819).

  • Matthew Grose? No, this is a memorial for him. His burial record is in Dodington, Somerset. 1821 or 1824? Is there a gravestone in Dodington (All Saints Church?) in addition to this Memorial in Gwinear?

Our Matthew Grose (1788-1849)), might have attended this burial in Dodington, Somerset in 1824. He was in Dodington in 1821 (baptising son, Thomas). Also his son, John, was born (in ‘England’) around 1824.

  • Jane Grose (nee Williams)? Possibly. No burial record found yet for Jane. She could be buried here in Gwinear with her children. She died in April 1841 in Goldsithney, Perranuthnoe (Penzance district).

Phew!

So a few questions answered & few more things to find out! As always, please comment or contact if spot any errors, or have useful advice or info.

The next post will look at another interesting gravestone at St Gwinear, Cornwall.

Further reading and useful research sites:

www.findmypast.com

www.ancestry.co.uk

http://www.opc-cornwall.org/Par_new/e_g/gwinear.php

http://www.cornwall-opc-database.org/

http://www.westcountrygenealogy.com/cornwall/gwinear/

Matthew Grose opens ‘a fine granite quarry’ at Foxdale

Quick recap

You will recall from a previous post, (The Saga of Matthew Grose, John Taylor and The Isle of Man Mining Company) that during January 1846, Captain Matthew Grose (1788-1849) was dramatically and unfairly dismissed (handcuffs indeed!!) from the Isle of Man (Foxdale) Mining Company.

By July 1846, the Crown Mine Agent, John Taylor had stepped in and deprived the company of their lease to land throughout the island, (apart from their mines at Marown). He gave Captain Matthew Grose setts of land taken from the company.

So what happened next?

A fine granite quarry:

By September 1846, the Manx Liberal newspaper reported on an exciting new venture by the entrepreneurial Captain Grose, his sons and Richard Powning (his son-in-law):

“We are gratified to learn that in consequence of the recent eruptions at the Foxdale mines, our Island is likely to he benefitted to a considerable extent. A fine granite quarry has just been opened in the neighbourhood of the mines by Messrs. Grose and Powning, and we learn that orders have been received for large shipments of the stones to Birkenhead, to be used in the construction of the docks now building there.”

Manx Liberal, Saturday, September 12, 1846; Page: 3, Courtesy of Manx National Heritage

The first shipment:

By January 1847, the Manx Sun newspaper reports on the first shipment of Foxdale granite leaving the island for Birkenhead. There is also interest from London for paving blocks.

“The first shipment of excellent granite, raised at Foxdale, took place this week at Peel, for Birkenhead. Some of the blocks weighed five tons, and are intended for the construction of Birkenhead docks. We likewise have heard that a party in London are in treaty with the workers of this quarry for smaller blocks, suitable for paving. The stone is reported to be of excellent quality.”

Manx Sun, Saturday, January 16, 1847; Page: 4, Courtesy of Manx National Heritage

Paving Douglas:

In January 1847, it is reported that Douglas is to be paved with Foxdale granite…

“We understand that the High Bailiff of this town [Douglas] intends to order -from the proprietors of the granite quarry, at Foxdale, stone to pave the market-place. If found to answer, of which there can be no doubt, the streets are to be all paved with the recently-explored Foxdale granite, of which there is an inexhaustible supply. It is said to surpass the Scotch granite, the only place where that stone is to be had in Great Britain.”

 

Manx Liberal, Saturday, January 30, 1847; Page: 3, Courtesy of Manx National Heritage

Church at St. John’s:



In May 1847, the Manx Liberal newspaper reported on the enormous quantities of granite being shipped and how the new church at St Johns’s will be built of Foxdale granite:

The granite quarry at Foxdale, is likely to become of great benefit to this Island. Tbe number of men has been increased of late, and carts from the different parishes in the Island are employed in conveying the blocks of stone to Douglas daily, from whence it is exported to London; one day this week the dray of Mr. John Hogg, of this town, brought down three tons, in company with a train of other carts. Several of the hands who worked at the Scotch quarries are employed here, and by them the stone is acknowledged to be of a superior quality, and is of easier transition for exportation than in Scotland. The new church at St. John’s, it is said, will be built of this stone.

Manx Liberal, Saturday, May 22, 1847; Page: 3, Courtesy of Manx National Heritage


Image of Tynwald Church, St John’s © (Posted with permission of image owner: Rob Cannell, Isle of Man)

Stone for sale:

In May 1848, we see Matthew Grose, Richard Powning (his son-in-law) and a business associate, Charles Berry, selling off granite stone:


Manx Sun, Wednesday, May 17, 1848, Courtesy of Manx National Heritage

(If anyone knows what this ‘Coroner’s Sale’ might imply, please let me know!)

Death:

In 1849, Captain Matthew Grose passes away on 19th June, 1849 and buried on 23rd June at St. Ruinus, Marown.

“On Thursday last at Laburnum Cottage, near this town. Capt Matthew Grose, for many years manager of the Foxdale Mines, aged 70 years.”

Manx Sun, Wednesday, June 27, 1849; Page: 5, Courtesy of Manx National Heritage

The Albert Tower:

Just a month after Captain Grose’s death, the Manx Liberal newspaper reports on the opening of the Albert Tower in Ramsey and how Foxdale granite was used for the window corners:

The Tower was built by subscription by the inhabitants of Ramsey, from the design of G. W Buck, Esq.; it is a square building, about forty feet high, built of blue slate, with the exception of the window corners and coping, which are built of granite from the Foxdale quarries. The door is on the eastern side, over which are the three legs of man, and the following inscription :

—”Albert Tower. Erected on the spot where H.R.H. Prince Albert stood to view Ramsey and its neighbourhood, during the visit of Her Most Gracious Majesty Queen Victoria to Ramsey Bay, the XXth September, MDCCCXLVII.”

Manx Liberal, Saturday, July 28, 1849; Page: 3, Courtesy of Manx National Heritage
img_4243
Image of Albert Tower, Ramsey, Isle of Man © (Image owner: Adventurous Ancestors)

A tribute:

Perhaps it is a fitting tribute to the adventurous ancestor, Captain Matthew Grose. He was baptised in the tiny hilltop village of Loxton, Somerset in 1788 whilst his Cornish father and uncle were there on a speculative copper mining venture.
After his own mining adventures (in Cornwall, Somerset and the Isle of Man), he ends by contributing materials to build Birkenhead docks, pave the streets of Douglas and London, build a church at St John’s and finally decorate the Albert Tower – which is built on a hilltop, celebrating the visit of Royalty.

Further reading:

Quarries
Albert Tower
Church at St John’s

Matthew Grose and Mary Tregonning, married 1839 in Halkyn, Flintshire

Another little diversion of sorts…

From census and obituary records we know that Matthew Grose (1788 – 1849) was married twice.

Firstly to Mary Wearn (1790-1839) who he married 6th June 1809 in Phillack, Cornwall.

This Mary died at Foxdale Mines, Isle of Man on 8th January 1839.

Secondly to another Mary – who (from marriage index records and discussing with others over the years) we’ve worked out was most likely Mary Tregonning (1796-1864).

According to the England & Wales, Civil Registration Marriage Index, 1837-1915, Mary Tregonning and Matthew Grose both married in Quarter 3 (July-Aug-Sept), 1839 in Holywell, Flintshire.

If this is the right person, Matthew Grose married Mary Tregonning seven months after his first wife, (Mary Wearn) died.

The big questions have always been:

Why did Matthew Grose get married in Flintshire if he lived in the Isle of Man? Was his new wife living there?

If he remarried in 1839, where is his new spouse (now, Mary Grose) on the 1841 census, which was taken on the evening of 6th June 1841? She is on the Isle of Man as his widow in the 1851 and 1861 censuses.


It was worthwhile obtaining their marriage record to look for more clues:

From the marriage record we find the following additional information:

Date of Marriage: 12th August, 1839

Place of Marriage: Parish Church of Halkin (Halkyn), Flintshire

To see they married in Halkyn is very interesting because Matthew Grose’s younger sister, Eliza lived there with her husband, Absalom Francis who was the Mine Agent at Halkyn lead mines.

The groom, Matthew Grose, is a widower and mine agent. His father is Matthew Grose, a mine agent.

This information helps confirm that we’ve got the ‘right’ Matthew Grose here!

The bride, Mary Tregonning, is a spinster. Her father is James Tregonning, a mine agent.

This is interesting as we didn’t know if Mary was a spinster or a widow. Also we haven’t had her father’s name or occupation before seeing this record.

Residence at time of marriage: Llan Township

Were they both really ‘living’ there, or just visiting?

The witnesses are Mary and William Davy (or Davey?)

I think their surname looks like ‘Davy‘ – what do others think?

These witnesses need further research to see if there is any family connection. Matthew Grose’s grandmother’s maiden name was ‘Davy/Davey’. Also, his sister’s (Eliza’s) mother-in-law’s maiden name was ‘Davy/Davey’.

Just to go off on another tangent – one day we’ll figure out where Sir Humphry Davy – the famous Cornish chemist and inventor – fits into this family tree.

Undoubtedly information from this marriage record will form the basis of further research and likely another genealogical rabbit warren  to lose ourselves in!

History of Mining and Engineers in Cornwall: A great resource

A short diversion before we continue with the tale of Captain Matthew Grose and his sons, (the Cornish Mine Agents in the Isle of Man).

NAVSBOOKS

Anyone with a deeper interest in the history of mining and engineers in Cornwall, should follow the fantastic NAVSBOOKS blog.

“Navsbooks is the blog and website of the author and publisher John Manley, who produces books on maps, navigation and Cornish history.”


The NAVSBOOKS blog covers in great detail many of those involved in Cornish mining and engineering, including Samuel Grose, John Taylor and William West.

ISLE OF MAN

Interestingly it seems that all of these had links of some sort to the Isle of Man.

We’ve already seen how Samuel Grose (“the most scientific engineer in Cornwall”) was the first cousin of Matthew Grose (1788-1849), who moved to the Isle of Man. Also how John Taylor intervened when the Isle of Man Mining company dramatically dismissed Matthew Grose.

But what about William West?

WILLIAM WEST

A newspaper article from 1851, in the Manx Sun, describes how the Tynwald Mining Company (operating in Marown, Isle of Man) imported…

 “a splendid engine”

that was…

“erected under the direction of Mr. William West of Cornwall which works admirably and fully to the satisfaction of all concerned.”



Manx Sun, Saturday, August 30, 1851, Courtesy of Manx National Heritage

Yet again we see the close ties between mining and engineering in the Isle of Man and Cornwall.

The saga of Matthew Grose, John Taylor and the Isle of Man Mining Company

Before we cover the career of Captain Matthew Grose (1819 – 1887), we’re going to look back more closely at his father’s time with The Isle of Man Mining Company.

Just to recap – his father was Captain Matthew Grose (1788 – 1849) born in Loxton, Somerset to Cornish parents. He was a first cousin of the ‘most scientific engineer in Cornwall’, Captain Samuel Grose junior (1791 – 1866).

FIRSTLY… HAPPY TIMES!

In 1828, The Isle of Man Mining Company is formed by three adventurers from the Chester area. The mines at Foxdale are under the management of Mr. William Jones. Captain Matthew Grose (1788 – 1849) is employed as the Mine Agent there.

In 1833, local newspapers indicate that Matthew Grose is a popular Agent and member of the community. By this time he’d worked for the Isle of Man Mining Company for approximately five years.

After a company dinner, the engineer of the water wheel, Thom Anthony, expresses his gratitude by writing into the Mona’s Herald newspaper.

…we have great reason to be very satisfied and thankful in this neighbourhood, as so many of us are employed by the Isle of Man Company

Thom praises his employers…

…while the worthy adventurers carry on at the rate they do, and employ so worthy Agents, who behave like gentlemen ought to…

and he describes the music and dancing on Captain Grose’s street…

…cheering the ladies and gentlemen with all our might, three fidlers came forward, and played up as hard as they could, when a ring was made on Captain Grose’s street, and there we enjoyed ourselves and danced away in great style until it became dark…

Thom describes the staff raising a glass to the company…

…drinking the health of the Isle of Man Mining Company and their Agents



Mona’s Herald, Friday, October 04, 1833; Page: 3, Courstesy of Manx National Heritage


In 1844 Captain Grose advertises for a schoolmaster for the Foxdale Mines School. It is understood the school has been open on the Isle of Man since 1833, or earlier.

Mona’s Herald, Tuesday, May 14, 1844; Section: Front page, Page: 1 Courtesy of Manx National Heritage.

DRAMATIC DISMISSAL!

In January 1846, after eighteen years of employment with the Isle of Man Mining company, Captain Matthew Grose is dramatically dismissed from his position. Rumours swirl that he has been ejected from his dwelling in handcuffs and not paid his salary.

The company place a Public Notice in the newspaper announcing his dismissal:


Manx Liberal, Saturday, January 10, 1846; Page: 2, Courtesy of Manx National Heritage

As ‘the skeet‘ (gossip) spreads across the Isle of Man, Matthew Grose responds a week later by placing his own advertisement in the newspaper, showing that he is…

“..as ignorant of the cause of my Offence as the Public themselves.”


Manx Liberal, Saturday, January 17, 1846; Page: 11, Courtesy of Manx National Heritage

During March 1846, Matthew Grose further defends his character by publishing documents from the Isle of Man Mining company – which state he was considered…

“…honest, sober and attentive and having a good knowledge of practical mining operations.”

It seems that after the death of the general manager, Mr William Jones, the company were just having a ‘general change in management’ at Foxdale mines and…

“…now express their regret that so harsh a mode was adopted as they are informed was done–as it was far from their intention to cast any imputation on Capt.Grose’s character…”

 


Manx Liberal, Saturday, March 07, 1846, Courtesy of Manx National Heritage

JOHN TAYLOR INTERVENES!

By July 1846, there is a dramatic conclusion to the saga when the Crown mining agent, John Taylor, intervenes. He deprives the Isle of Man Mining company of their lease to land throughout the island, (apart from their mines at Marown) and gives Captain Matthew Grose setts of land taken from the company. The rest of the island (except Lonan) is thrown open to the public.

The newspaper reports…

“The advantages to be derived to the inhabitants by the visit of Mr. Taylor are incalculable; and much is due to Capt.Grose for having been the chief instrument by which all these beneficial changes have been effected.

 

The company takes action too:

“The Company, determined not to be outdone by Mr. Taylor, have crowned his operations by paying Captain Grose the money due to him, and by a second time dismissing Mr. Beckwith from his situation as cashier! ! “

 

Undoubtably capturing the relief and mood of the public at the time…

“This is retributive justice with a vengeance. Handcuffs indeed!!



 Mona’s Herald, Wednesday, July 15, 1846; Page: 3, Courtesy of Manx National Heritage.

 

 …

In the next post, we’ll see what opportunities and risks were taken by Captain Matthew Grose (and his sons) after these dramatic events!

Thanks’, Resources and Further Reading:

Many thanks to iMuseum Newspapers & Publications  for providing digital access to the Isle of Man newspapers (from 1792 to 1960). Images and text are shared on this blog in accordance with their policy of using & sharing for ‘non-commercial personal use’.