Life, how uncertain! Death, how sure!

This post will look at the ancient parish church of St Runius in Marown, Isle of Man… and an interesting grave marker for members of the Grose family in the churchyard there.

In the previous post we looked for the graves of the Mining Engineer, Matthew Grose junior (1819-1887) & his second wife, Elizabeth nee Qualtrough (1835-1918), both buried at Kirk Christ, Rushen, Isle of Man.

Some questions remain…

Where is his first wife (Anne Grose nee Read, 1818-1868) buried?

Where is his father (Matthew Grose senior, 1788-1849) buried?
marown sign

Photo © Phil Catterall (cc-by-sa/2.0)

old_mn

Sketch of 1834. Old Kirk Marown with seats for 250. Courtesy of A Manx Note Book

nave

Photo © Richard Hoare (cc-by-sa/2.0)

The Old Church:

The Old Church has been written about by many people, in the past and present day… with various versions of how it got it’s name:

St. Runius, also known as Old Kirk Marown, is a very quaint old church which still has candles for lights instead of electricity.

It is known as Old Kirk Marown because a new church was built in its place in 1853 on the main Douglas to Peel road.

St. Runius is a simple structure dating from the 12th century with alterations and extensions from 1750 to 1755 and in the late 1790’s.

It is called St. Runius as it is dedicated to St. Ronan of Lismore in Ireland and Marown also takes its name from this Saint “Ma-Ronan”, Marown.

From the IOM Photography website, 2014.

The original building was from approximately 1200 AD and was enlarged in 1754 AD.

Three bishops are possibly buried here; Lonnan, Connaghan, and Runius.

The old church was replaced around 1860, when a new church was opened. Old St Runius continued to be used occasionally for special services.

From the Isle of Man Guide website

According to a note by the late Professor Sir John Rhys, in “Mannin” (No. 2) :” the Parish Church of Marown, spelled variously Marown, Maronne, and Maroon. Skeeley Maroon is dedicated to a Saint called Maronog, in the Irish Calendar; and in the Scottish Calendar, Ronan.”

In the Manx Doomsday Book, or Manorial Rent Roll, of 1511, A.D. , the parish is styled St. Runii—St. Runy was evidently one of the Columban missionaries who came to the Isle of Man probably about the 7th Century, and it is in the Old Churchyard of Marown where his remains, with those of St. Lomanus and St. Onca are supposed to be buried, ” and these for ever lie un-molested.”

From A Manx Note Book

Why was a new church built?

With the improvement of the Douglas/Peel main road in the early 19th Century population growth focused on Crosby and the old church became too small and too far from the congregation.

In 1844 Phillip Killey, owner of a brewery in Douglas, gave land from his estate adjoining the main road between Crosby and Glen Vine for a new Church.

Tynwald approved the scheme in 1847, the foundation stone was laid by Bishop Auckland in 1849 and the Church consecrated in 1859.

From A Manx Note Book

Many years later on the 5th Oct., 1924, A.E. CLARKE wrote about this event at Marown Vicarage…

Needless to say that , this gift was accepted. and in a few years time from this date, the Old Church, so far as public worship was concerned, was forsaken for the new.

It was not so, however, with regard to burials.

The people of Marown still clung tenaciously to the old ground, where the remains of their forefathers lay for generations.

Marown Old Church - geograph.org.uk - 3125

Photo of Marown Old Church courtesy of Andy Stephenson [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

The ‘Grose’ Obelisk:

In the churchyard of St Runius, Marown, Isle of Man there is a granite obelisk and two fallen headstones surrounded by railings. The granite is possibly from ‘the fine granite quarry’ that the Grose family opened at Foxdale.

2017-07-06 10.54.50

Photo © Robert Cannell


Over the years there have been discussions (and confusion!) about the individuals buried there.
By studying a combination of hard-to-read memorial inscriptions and incomplete burial records, this is our best interpretation of the burials. If any further information comes to light, then it will be corrected and shared on the blog.

 

3626338_56c47eff

Photo © Richard Hoare (cc-by-sa/2.0)

Who is buried there?

The Grose family used St Runius as their main local church for baptising, marrying and burying for many years. There was a track from their home at Cornelly/Jones Mine (part of Foxdale Mines) to the church. Other churches were used too (eg, Patrick), but there is a lot of activity at St Runius.

It is likely that three generations of the Grose family are buried at St Runius, Marown… Matthew Grose senior (1788-1849) with both of his wives, his daughter-in-law and perhaps five of his grandchildren.
The first ‘Grose’ burial was likely Matthew Grose senior’s first wife, Mary Grose (nee Wearn) buried 1839. She doesn’t appear in the burial records, but the inscription on the headstone (see section below) and newspaper obituary indicates this.

mary wearn

Manks Advertiser, Tuesday, January 08, 1839; Page: 3 (Via iMusuem)


An infant, John Grose, was buried in Marown in 1845. This is likely, John Matthew Grose the son of John Grose and Charlotte (nee Clucas).

johnl grose

Via iMuseum


Matthew Grose senior was buried in 1849

matt

Manx Liberal, Saturday, June 23, 1849; Page: 3
(Via iMusuem)


Frederick William Grose (Matthew junior’s son) buried 1858

fred

Mona’s Herald, Wednesday, June 16, 1858; Page: 3
(Via iMusuem)

Matthew Grose senior’s second wife Mary Grose (nee Tregonning) buried 1864

mary treg

Mona’s Herald, Wednesday, November 23, 1864; Page: 3
(Via iMusuem)


Matthew Grose junior’s wife, Anne Weston Grose (nee Read) was buried 1868

annie weston

Mona’s Herald, Wednesday, May 13, 1868; Page: 7
(Via iMusuem)

list of burials marown

From Isle of Man, Burial Index, 1598-2003 via Ancestry UK

Additionally, 3 children of Matthew senior’s daughter, Jane Powning (nee Grose) are buried at Marown.

powning burials

From Isle of Man, Burial Index, 1598-2003 via Ancestry UK

In the Press…

The ‘Grose’ obelisk at Marown has been written about in the newspapers…

From the Isle of Man Weekly Times (1 Oct 1932)…

Comparatively few of the gravestones in Marown are used to point the moral of the shortness of life at its longest and the possible suddenness of death.
Captain Matthew Grose [junior] of the Ballacorkish mine, Rushen, erected a monument to his son [Frederick] in the form of an obelisk, bearing on its four sides the words,

Time, how short! 

Eternity, how long! 

Life, how uncertain!

Death, how sure!

http://www.isle-of-man.com/manxnotebook/gazateer/gyards/mn.htm


Analysing the Memorial inscriptions:

There are inscriptions on the fallen stones and obelisk.

From a long discussion on a Manx genealogy forum (from 2006) we can see the following incomplete inscriptions were recorded…

http://www.isle-of-man.com/genealogy/messageboard/index.pl/md/read/id/509238

In memory of Ann Mary Grose the beloved wife of Capt Matthew Grose …………….mines…………..January 8th 1839

Weep not for me my ………..

My children dear my ……………

Prepare yourselves………

also the above named capt Matthew Grose who died on the 19th Jun 1848 1849 aged 62 years

Thanks to Rob Cannell for cleaning the headstone, so the ‘Ann’ above could be corrected to ‘Mary’ which corresponds to Mary Grose (nee Wearn).

In memory of Frederick William son of Capt Matthew Grose [junior] and Ann Weston his wife of Ballacorkish Parish of Rushen

Born March 15th 1850 died June 2nd 1858

Conclusion:

Confusion reigned for a long time because there was an 1839 obituary for a Mary Grose, but it seemed her burial was recorded in 1864. Turns out they were both right – they’re two different people! Both wives of Matthew Grose senior and both called Mary!

Add to the mix a memorial inscription from 1839 transcribed as Ann Grose instead of Mary Grose! Then it turns out that there are actually two Mary Groses… and an Anne Grose buried there too! Anne being a wife of a Captain Matthew Grose too… no not that one – his son!

We got there in the end (hopefully!). It’s a reminder to check as many sources as possible and see the originals, not transcriptions where possible.

Originally erected by the mining engineer, Matthew Grose junior, mourning his young son Frederick, the granite obelisk is a fine monument to the generations of the Grose family buried at St Runius, Marown and elsewhere on the Isle of Man.

Matthew Grose junior may now be in an unmarked grave at Rushen, but the monument he created for others in his family has stood for almost 160 years.

Thanks and Further Reading:

I must thank Rob Cannell for providing plenty of information and some of the great photos for this post. Also for cleaning up that headstone!

A Manx Note Book

Ellan Vannin Volume 1

IOM Photography

Isle of Man Guide

 

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Finding Grose Graves at Kirk Christ, Rushen, Isle of Man

Locating the graves of Captain Matthew Grose (1819-1887) and his second wife Elizabeth nee Qualtrough/Luff (1835-1918) has been a challenge.

I am extremely grateful to the people who have helped.

Over the years, fellow researcher, Rob Cannell, has hunted throughout the graveyards at Kirk Chist Holy Trinity Church (Rushen Parish Church) several times. We concluded that Matthew and Elizabeth Grose were most likely buried in unmarked graves, or their headstones were now illegible.

Image of Kirk Christ Holy Trinity Church © (Posted with permission of image owner: Rob Cannell, Isle of Man)

Rob and I even discussed whether they were buried at Rushen at all, when certain records mentioned the place of death as ‘Arbory’.

Could they be at Arbory Parish Church and not Rushen? To confuse myself further, I realised that Arbory Parish Church and Kirk Christ were both in the sheading of Rushen!

A breakthrough!

When Rob found original images of the burial records we studied them closely for clues.

Matthew Grose, buried 14th October 1887


Courtesy of Manx National Heritage via FamilySearch

On the same page, (for other burials) the Vicar’s name was fairly easy to transcribe – a ‘Blundell Browne’ who was easily traced as the Vicar of Kirk Christ, Rushen from 1887-1893. So it was Rushen, not Arbory Church!

The Curate’s name was more difficult to transcribe, but eventually got it as D.M. Jenkyus. This was confirmed with some further online searching which showed there was a Curate at Rushen in 1886, called David Melbourne Jenkyus.

Then there was a code ‘K21‘ the margin. Could this refer to his burial plot?

Rushen Church has several churchyards.

  • The Rushen Old Yard (Southside)
  • The Rushen Old Yard (Northside)
  • The 1899 Old Yard
  • The 1899 Yard
  • The Ashes Plots (in the 1899 Yard)
  • The 1926 Yard
  • The 1967 Yard

Initially, the dates and plots seemed to indicate that Matthew Grose would be in the Rushen Old Yard (Southside) where a row K appeared… but there was no plot 21!

Luckily, I spotted that ‘The 1899 Old Yard’ near the Vicarage garden was probably an extension from 1869.

I’d assumed it was from 1899 onwards, which would have been too late for Matthew Grose’s burial in 1887. However, if ‘The 1899 Old Yard‘  opened in 1869, his grave could be there. Also, a plot ‘K21’ was listed there. It was promising!

Found!

After contacting the very helpful Claire at Rushen (who organised a search), I received the superb photo below of Matthew Grose’s burial plot. Many thanks to Andy Knight for locating & photographing this.

Image of burial plot at Rushen Churchyard © (Posted with permission of image owner: Andy Knight, Isle of Man)

As we’d predicted, there isn’t a headstone or marker here for Matthew Grose junior (1819-1887). Claire advised that few survive – many stones were damaged or lost from this particular churchyard.

Perhaps he had a headstone in the past? Either way, the plot has been found so another mystery SOLVED!

Elizabeth Grose, buried 19th June 1918

We undertook a similar investigation in the hunt for Elizabeth Grose’s headstone, using her burial record found online by Rob.

.

Courtesy of Manx National Heritage via FamilySearch

The curate’s name was transcribed as W.R. Cannell. We discovered he was the Rev. William R. Cannell after finding his name online associated with the erection of the Lychgate at Kirk Christ in 1921.

Code 697 appears in the margin and again this was assumed to be the burial plot.

The maps of the churchyards at Kirk Christ indicated that plot 697 was likely to be in ‘The 1899 Yard’.

Claire and Andy did a great job of researching this – locating & photographing her exact plot too.

Image of burial plot at Rushen Churchyard © (Posted with permission of image owner: Andy Knight, Isle of Man)

No headstone or marker here for Elizabeth Grose (1835-1918) either, but another mystery SOLVED!

In the next post we’ll look at some Grose graves at St Runius, Marown, Isle of Man where there is MOST DEFINITELY something special to see!

Thanks’, Resources and Further Reading:

Many thanks to Rob, Claire and Andy for all your help with locating and photographing these plots.

 

 

 

 

‘GROSE’ Burials at Gwinear, Cornwall

In previous posts, (parts 1, 2 & 3), we’ve looked at ‘GROSE’ graves & memorials at the Parish Church of Saint Gwinear in Cornwall.

How do these compare with all ‘GROSE’ burials recorded in Gwinear, listed on the Cornwall OPC Database? Is anyone else related to Matthew Grose (1788-1849) who migrated to the Isle of Man?

(Screenshot from Cornwall OPC Database: accessed 15th March, 2017)

Who’s who?

Working down the list in date order…

  • William Grose and Grace Grose are siblings both buried in 1818. Their grave is posted about here. They are the younger siblings of John Grose ‘the Perranuthnoe grocer’ and Matthew Grose ‘who migrated to Foxdale, Isle of Man’.
  • Samuel Grose buried 1825 and Eleanor Grose (nee Giddy) buried 1850, are the parents of ‘the famous engineer’ Samuel Grose. No photo of their grave yet. Can you help?
  • Matthew Grose buried 1853 is the younger brother of ‘the famous engineer’ Samuel Grose. No photo of Matthew’s grave yet. Can you help?
  • Jane Grose (nee Jennings) buried 1856 is the wife of John Grose ‘the Perranuthnoe grocer’ (younger brother of Matthew Grose ‘who migrated to Foxdale, Isle of Man’). Her grave is posted about here.
  • Samuel Grose (buried 1866) is ‘the famous engineer’and Nanny Grose (buried 1867), is Ann (nee Vivian), his wife. Their grave is posted about here.
  • Thomas Grose, buried 1885, not yet researched. Can you help?
  • Ruth Grose, buried 1890, not yet researched. Can you help?

Conclusion:

From the ten individuals buried in Gwinear, graves for half of them have been located, photographed, identified and discussed.

Eight of the individuals listed, (plus others, not buried, but on memorials) are related to our adventurous ancestor, Matthew Grose (1788-1849) who migrated to Foxdale, Isle of Man.

The final two, Ruth and Thomas Grose, might be related too, but they’re to be researched another day!

Next stop, back to the Isle of Man!!

Graves at St Gwinear: part 3: Samuel Grose junior (1791-1866)

The Grave of ‘the Most Scientific Engineer in Cornwall’!

At the Parish Church of Saint Gwinear in Cornwall, we have a very special grave to see.

The Grave:

Image of grave at St Gwinear Church, Cornwall © (Posted with permission of image owner: Fiona)

Transcription provided with photo:

SACRED
 
TO THE MEMORY OF
 
SAMUEL GROSE
 
OF THIS PARISH
 
WHO DIED 12th JUNE 1866
 
AGED 75 years.

ALSO ANN
 
HIS BELOVED WIFE
 
WHO DIED 15th MARCH 1867
 
AGED 77 years.


Sown in corruption raised in glory

What’s so interesting about these pair?

Samuel Grose junior (1791-1866) was called ‘the most scientific engineer in Cornwall’. He was a pupil of Richard Trevithick and employed around 1812 at Wheal Prosper to erect a high pressure engine. From his obituary we also discover…

He was engineer to some of the principal mines in Cornwall up to the time of his death.
In 1825 Mr. S. Grose first introduced clothing the cylinders, nozzles, steam pipes, &c., in an engine at Wheal Hope mine, and in 1827 he carried out his plans in an 80in. engine at Wheal Lowan mine; he also increased the pressure of steam there, obtaining from this engine a duty of 60,000,000. His engines were always characterised by a strict attention to detail, which displayed a keen discernment on the part of the designer.
We had the pleasure of his acquaintance, and much admired his kind disposition and unpretending manners. He lived not to astonish the world with very brilliant discoveries, but he “Did good by stealth and blushed to find it fame”, and left the world bequeathing to engineering science his improvements in the Cornish engine, which rank first in importance since the time of Trevithick and Wolf.

via Samuel Grose – Graces Guide

Family Connections:

Samuel junior was the son of Samuel Grose senior (1764-1825) who managed Dodington Copper Mines in Somerset and held positions at mines in Cornwall, including Wheal Alfred.

This makes him the nephew of Matthew Grose (1761-1824) who was a Mine Agent at Dodington Mines. Matthew’s memorial, also at Gwinear, is covered in this post.

Samuel Grose junior is the first cousin of John Grose (1793-1842), the grocer and draper from Goldsithney, Perranuthnoe, Cornwall who also has a memorial at Gwinear. On the photo (above), it can be seen in the background.

Likewise, Samuel Grose junior is the first cousin of Matthew Grose (1788-1849) who migrated to Foxdale, Isle of Man. This cousin was a Mine Agent at the Foxdale Mines from 1828-1846, before opening a ‘fine granite quarry’ near Foxdale.

Samuel Grose’s Will:

The details and date on his Will, match perfectly with those on the grave.

England & Wales, National Probate Calendar (Index of Wills and Administrations),1861-1941 Ancestry.com Online publication – Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. Original data – Principal Probate Registry. Calendar of the Grants of Probate and Letters of Administration made in the Probate Registries of the High Court of Justice in England. London

From the Cornwall OPC database we find Samuel’s burial at Gwinear:

Day Month 16-Jun
Year 1866
Parish Or Reg District Gwinear
Forename Samuel
Surname GROSE
Age 75
Residence Wall

Although it is well documented Samuel was born at Dodington or Nether Stowey in Somerset, whilst his father worked there, we don’t have a baptism record, yet.

Samuel’s wife, Ann Grose:

Anne [Ann, Nanny] Grose (nee Vivian) was the daughter of John Vivian and Mary Carne. No definite baptism record yet. From the census records she was born in London around 1791.

(There is a baptism record in Gwinear for Anna Vivian, baptised 16th Feb, 1796, daughter of John and Mary which may be worthy of further investigation).

From the Cornwall OPC Database, Samuel Grose “the younger” and Anne Vivian married 23rd July, 1812 at Gwinear. His rank/profession is given as ‘gentleman’ on the marriage record. The witnesses are John Vivian, (likely her father) and John Vivian junior, (likely her brother).

On the Cornwall OPC database,  see a burial for a ‘Nanny Grose’ in Gwinear that fits.

Day Month 20-Mar
Year 1867
Parish Or Reg District Gwinear
Forename Nanny
Surname GROSE
Age 77
Residence Wall

Also a match from the England & Wales, Civil Registration Death Index, 1837-1915

Name: Nanny Grose
Estimated birth year: abt 1790
Registration Year: 1867
Registration Quarter: Jan-Feb-Mar
Age at Death: 77
Registration district: Redruth


FreeBMD. England & Wales, Civil Registration Death Index, 1837-1915 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006.

Conclusion:

An ordinary looking grave for an extraordinary engineer and his wife!

From exploring the associated records we get confirmation that this is their grave. Both Samuel Grose junior and his wife Ann[e] were buried here at the Parish Church of St Gwinear, Cornwall.

In the next post, we’ll have a quick look at which other family graves or memorials we should expect to find here at Gwinear, Cornwall.

(Then back over to the Isle of Man!)

Graves at St Gwinear: part 2: John Grose (1793 – 1842)

Another Grave!

Still at the Parish Church of Saint Gwinear in Cornwall, we have another interesting grave/memorial to look at.

John Grose:

This time it’s John Grose (the younger brother of Matthew Grose (1788-1849) who migrated to the Isle of Man).

Image of grave at St Gwinear Church, Cornwall © (Posted with permission of image owner: Fiona)

Transcription provided with photo:

SACRED

TO

THE MEMORY OF

JOHN GROSE

Who departed this life on the

16th day of May

1842

Aged 49 years.

Also of

JANE GROSE

Wife of the above

Who departed this life on the

30th day of October

1856

Aged 50 years.

In love they lived, in peace they died

Their lives was craved but God denied.

ALSO OF

EDWARD JENNINGS

Who died June 23rd 1878

Aged 54 years

He died trusting in his saviour.

What do we know about John Grose?

John Grose is the son of Captain Matthew Grose (1761-1824) whose Memorial is also at Gwinear and details covered in this other post.

According to the 1841 census (below) and also his 1842 Will, John Grose was a grocer and draper in Goldsithney, Perranuthnoe, Cornwall.

(Source: Class: HO107; Piece: 143; Book: 11; Civil Parish: Perran Ulthnoe; County: Cornwall; Enumeration District: 6; Folio: 27; Page: 22; Line: 15; GSU roll: 241265 (Census Returns of England and Wales, 1841; Ancestry.com Operations, Inc; 2010; Provo, UT, USA))

We don’t have a baptism record for John Grose yet, but from his grave we can estimate his birth around 1793.

This fits with the Cornwall Memorial Inscription record on FindMyPast.

First name(s) JOHN
Last name GROSE
Age 49
Birth year 1793
Death year 1842
Death date May 1842
Place GWINEAR

 

Also the England & Wales Deaths 1837-2007 record on FindMyPast

Death quarter 2
Death year 1842
District Penzance
County Cornwall
Volume 9
Page 152

 

Although we have this Memorial Inscription and death record, we don’t yet have a burial record in Gwinear. Is this headstone indicating a burial place, or memorial for John Grose?

Captain?

Another question: He is titled as Captain John Grose on his mother’s obituary.

“At Goldsithney, in Perranuthnoe, on the 23rd instant, at the house of her son, Capt. John Grose, Mrs. Jane Grose, aged 80 years, relict of the late Capt. Matthew Grose, formerly of Gwinear, and of Dodington in Somerset, much regretted and respected by her numerous family and friends. Her end was peace.”

Was he a retired ‘Mine Captain’, or another type of ‘Captain’?

His Will

His Will (transcription ongoing) looks like a an excellent resource of information as mentions some provision for his four living siblings:

“Mary, wife of Mine Agent, Henry Francis”…

“Elizabeth wife of Mine Agent, Obadiah Ash”…

“Eliza, wife of Mine Agent, Absalom Francis.” …

“the children of my brother Captain Matthew Grose as shall be then living.”…



(The National Archives; Kew, England; Prerogative Court of Canterbury and Related Probate Jurisdictions: Will Registers; Class: PROB 11; Piece: 1966)

What do we know about Jane Grose?

According to the marriage record of John Grose and Jane Jennings on 26th January, 1840 from the Cornwall OPC Database, Jane Grose (nee Jennings) is from Gwinear and daughter of Thomas Jennings, a farmer.

With further research on the Cornwall OPC Database, we see Jane’s mother is likely Ann Jennings (nee Hambly). Ann Hambly and Thomas Jennings married in Gwinear in 1802.

We don’t see a baptism in Gwinear for a Jane Jennings, but we have a record for Jennifer Jennings to parents ‘Thomas and Anne Jennings’ which looks like the best match for her.

Day Month 08-Feb
Year 1807
Parish Or Reg District Gwinear
Forename Jennifer
Surname JENNINGS
Sex dau
Father Forename Thomas
Mother Forename Anne

..

From Cornwall OPC database we have a burial record for Jane Grose in 1856 in Gwinear which corresponds with the grave.

What do we know about Edward Jennings?

Edward Jennings is the younger brother of Jane Grose (nee Jennings).

The details of his death match closely with those on the Cornwall OPC Database:

Day Month 27-Jun
Year 1878
Parish Or Reg District Gwinear
Forename Edward
Surname JENNINGS
Age 53
Residence Village

His baptism details from Cornwall OPC Database:

Day Month 27-Jun
Year 1824
Parish Or Reg District Gwinear
Forename Edward
Surname JENNINGS
Sex son
Father Forename Thomas
Mother Forename Ann
Residence Gwinear
Father Rank Profession Farmer


Phew (again)!

So once again a few questions answered & as usual a few more things to find out! Please comment or contact if any errors, or have advice or info.

The next post will look at a third interesting gravestone at St Gwinear, Cornwall. Then we’ll go back over to the Isle of Man!

Useful links:

Cornwall OPC Database

 

Graves at St Gwinear: part 1: Matthew Grose (1761 – 1824)

Thanks Fiona in England & Rob on the Isle of Man. They’ve provided all sorts of extra info & photos. Currently working through & (with their permission) will incorporate into forthcoming posts.

Now… Over to Cornwall!

Quick recap:

Before covering the career of Captain Matthew Grose (1819 – 1887) on the Isle of Man, we’re going for a change of scenery. Back over to Cornwall & Somerset where his grandfather lived & died.

You’ll recall his grandfather was also called Captain Matthew Grose (1761 – 1824) & was the brother of Samuel Grose senior (1764 – 1825). Both baptised in Redruth, Cornwall.

They’re on documents as Mine Captains running Dodington Copper Mines in Somerset for many years. In 1788 we see these two brothers on a mining venture in Loxton, Somerset & both baptising their children there, at the parish church of St. Andrew.

They worked at mines in both Somerset & Cornwall. This other blog post covers their careers & family in more detail.

This Matthew Grose (1761-1824) is the father of Matthew Grose (1788-1849) – who migrated to Foxdale, Isle of Man with his wife & children in 1828.

Graves at St Gwinear:

One of many ‘Wow!’ moments this week was receiving photos of graves, memorials & transcriptions from family history researcher, Fiona. She’s kindly given permission for these to be posted here on the blog.

Each grave will be written about on a separate post, because they all contain key pieces of information.

The Parish Church of Saint Gwinear, Cornwall:

The small village of Gwinear sits on a hill overlooking the Angarrack valley. It’s about three kilometres east of Hayle, Cornwall. There were many mines in the area.

Image of St Gwinear Church, Cornwall © (Posted with permission of image owner: Fiona)

 
At the church there are four main churchyard areas. According to the church website, during 2017, a project is ongoing – to research, record & map ALL burials & memorials there. It’ll be interesting to revisit these records at a later date.

Photograph of Matthew Grose’s Memorial:

Image of Memorial in Gwinear, Cornwall © (Posted with permission of image owner: Fiona)

Transcription provided with photo:

SACRED

To memory of

Captain Matthew Grose

Who died in Doddington in

Sommersetshire the 24th day

Of August 1824 aged 63 years.

And Jane his wife, who died

April 28th 1841 Aged 80 years.

Also William their son who

Died the 1st day of April 1818

Aged 21 years.

And Grace their daughter

Who died February 20th 1818

Aged 19 years.

Firstly, Matthew Grose:

The above transcription shows this as a memorial for Captain Matthew Grose who died in Dodington, Somerset on 24th August 1824 age 63.

The West Somerset Parish Register Transcriptions show his burial record in Dodington as:

Matthew Grose, 11th May, 1824, age 64.

On Findmypast, the Cornwall FHS memorial transcription from Gwinear gives the information as Mathew Grose, 21st August 1821, age 63.

Some slight differences in these records & transcriptions, but nothing too drastic! Confident all refer to same individual.

His wife, Jane Grose:

This transcription gives her information as April 28th 1841, Aged 80 years

This compares closely with her obituary from April 1841:

At Goldsithney, in Perranuthnoe, on the 23rd instant, at the house of her son, Capt. John Grose, Mrs. Jane Grose, aged 80 years, relict of the late Capt. Matthew Grose, formerly of Gwinear, and of Dodington in Somerset, much regretted and respected by her numerous family and friends. Her end was peace.

On Findmypast…

The memorial transcription also gives the information as Jane Grose, age 80, death date 28th April 1841.

Assume this is her death index record (from England & Wales Deaths 1837-2007) because Goldsithney is in the district of Penzance. It shows:

Jane Grose: Death quarter 2, 1841, Penzance, Volume 9, Page 126

William Grose:

The transcription above says died the 1st day of April 1818 Aged 21 years.

On FindMyPast…

Memorial transcription gives 17th April, 1818, Age 21

Burial transcription at Gwinear: 3rd April, 1818, Age 19.

Checking his baptism transcription, we see William Grose baptised in Gwinear on 27th December 1801 to parents Matthew and Jennifer Grose. This is reassuring that the ‘theory’ of Jennifer and Jane being the same person is holding up.

Grace Grose:

This transcription gives February 20th 1818. Aged 19 years.

On FindMyPast…

Memorial transcription: 20th February 1818, Age 19

Burial transcription: 21st February 1818, Age 17

Checking her baptism transcription, we see Grace Grose baptised in Gwinear on 27th December 1801 to parents Matthew and Jennifer Grose. At the same time as her brother, William – again ‘evidence’ that Jennifer and Jane are the same person.

Is Matthew’s wife, Jane or Jennifer Grose?

Apparently Jenny was originally a common ‘nickname’ for Jane. Perhaps that’s why her name varies on records as Jane, Jenefer, Jennifer, Gennifer etc. No marriage record has been found for a Matthew and Jennifer Grose – only Matthew and Jane.

Who’s actually buried here?

  • Their children? Probably. Both age 20-ish, William and Grace, have burial records in 1818 for Gwinear, so are likely buried here. How sad (and strange) that they were baptised at the same time & died within a few months of each other. Coincidence? Illness? An accident?

Their older brother, (our Matthew Grose (1788-1849)), would likely have attended this burial service in 1818. He was still in the Hayle/Phillack area (baptising own children, Mary in 1817 and Matthew in 1819).

  • Matthew Grose? No, this is a memorial for him. His burial record is in Dodington, Somerset. 1821 or 1824? Is there a gravestone in Dodington (All Saints Church?) in addition to this Memorial in Gwinear?

Our Matthew Grose (1788-1849)), might have attended this burial in Dodington, Somerset in 1824. He was in Dodington in 1821 (baptising son, Thomas). Also his son, John, was born (in ‘England’) around 1824.

  • Jane Grose (nee Williams)? Possibly. No burial record found yet for Jane. She could be buried here in Gwinear with her children. She died in April 1841 in Goldsithney, Perranuthnoe (Penzance district).

Phew!

So a few questions answered & few more things to find out! As always, please comment or contact if spot any errors, or have useful advice or info.

The next post will look at another interesting gravestone at St Gwinear, Cornwall.

Further reading and useful research sites:

www.findmypast.com

www.ancestry.co.uk

http://www.opc-cornwall.org/Par_new/e_g/gwinear.php

http://www.cornwall-opc-database.org/

http://www.westcountrygenealogy.com/cornwall/gwinear/